Category Archives: Writing

“Mother Water”

This is a bit more of my creative writing. And yes, I have been published in literary journals, in case you were asking. I published a short story in a single literary journal. There were a lot of  unknown names in there, but there were also a couple of big names – Gary Snyder and Allen Ginsberg. I remember at the bar afterwards Gary Snyder said he liked Journey Through the Zone. That was my story.

Anyway, is this better as prose or as a poem?

The sea. Once again the sea. Again and again the sea. Always again the sea. The sea from which we came. The sea to which we will return. Our mother. Mother water.

Or:

Mother  Water

The sea
Once again the sea
Again and again the sea
Always again the sea
The sea from which we came
The sea to which we will return
Our mother
Mother water

It does make a neat little very short poem. As prose it would have to be part of a larger work or possibly a microfiction or flash fiction story.

And if you are looking for influences, check out Samuel Beckett. Maybe James Joyce too, who knows? Beckett for sure though.

3 Comments

Filed under Literary Excursions, Literature, Poetry, Writing

“Sad Song”

This a bit of my creative writing here.

Is this better as prose or as a poem?

The years. The long years. The sadness of the years.

Or:

The years
The long years
The sadness of the years

If you make it poetry, it’s almost a perfect little encapsulated haiku. If fiction, it would have to be part of a larger work or it could be a three-line microfiction flash fiction story.

Leave a comment

Filed under Literary Excursions, Literature, Poetry, Writing

Ah, The Writing Life

I think it was on Tuesday that I wrote for 17 hours.

Yesterday, I wrote for three hours.

Today, I have already written for 10 hours.

I could quite honestly do this all the time and be happy as a clam as long as I am writing about something enjoyable.

People who aren’t writers just can’t understand how much we enjoy doing this. We can be happy as pigs in shit doing nothing but writing away almost every waking minute. No worries at all. It’s as if the world outside doesn’t even exist, which, come to think of it, would probably be a good thing. It’s a great way to make the whole lousy world just completely vanish for a while. I can’t think of a more productive and intellectual form of pure escapism.

Plus I feel productive. Even if I do not have any paid work going on, I feel like a waste lying around all day doing nothing. I even feel guilty watching videos or reading a novel. There is a part of me that always wants to be productive, even if I don’t have a regular job at all. Even if I am doing work that is making me no money at all, it beats feeling like a bum. I don’t like feeling like an unproductive person. It’s not even about a job or money. It’s about a productive use of your time.  I feel like even if you are unemployed or disabled, you ought to try to do something productive all day. Maybe it’s just me and my lousy White Protestant work ethic.

Leave a comment

Filed under Culture, Labor, Writing

Game/PUA: Brains – IQ – Creativity – Artistry – Genius or the “Brains Coefficient” As an “Additive Factor” in Game

Sure, life is an IQ test. Linda Gottfredson has proved this many times. She even has some papers on this topic. It’s a well validated scientific hypothesis and passes the common sense smell test once you throw the PC room freshener out the window.

Yes, life is an IQ test, but IQ won’t get you laid.

Well, wait, it might. My IQ actually gets me laid or at least nowadays it does, and it has for some time now, but maybe only since I was ~40. It really picked up in my late 40’s. Older women actually get turned on by smart guys, assuming they have some other things going for them (see below).

I don’t want to credit IQ too much. In a nod to the social constructionist IQ haters, maybe it is “the brain that I have created via decades of hard work via the use of this IQ tool” that gets me laid. I’m also creative, and women love to fuck artists. And the best writers are artists, especially if you write in a literary, poetic or “beautiful” way. If she falls in love with your prose, she’s yours, for now anyway. She may acquire your bed and maybe even a ring later on.

  1. Romantic love makes women horny.
  2. Artists make women feel romantic.
  3. Feeling romantic causes love.
  4. Cycle back to step one.

You do the math. It’s not hard. A 5th grader could figure out a basic equation like that.

Actually I would say that while my brain does get me laid, it does so late in life. It did not so much earlier in life. Sure I was smart as Hell earlier in life, but I spent most of my life imitating a stoned out, half retarded surfer as that was what got you chicks on the beach. As a young man, I spent a lot of time pretending I was stupid. I remember a sibling even criticized me for that. I shrugged my shoulders. I was trying to get laid. I wasn’t trying to win the Nobel Prize. Priorities, men, priorities!

As you get older, you run into smart women (and even girls) who actually want to fuck your brain. She will be fucking your body of course like everyone does, but she’s really fucking your brain. I have actually had women tell me this. As in more than one. They actually said, “I want to fuck your brain.” And they didn’t even know each other. Maybe there’s something to Jung after all.

She may confuse your brain with your body if your Game is good enough. I have run into this lately and it is a form of false signaling where a hot brain is serving as a “falses marker” for a hot body, but like all spells and forms of magic, that can’t last. I’d give it 6 weeks – 3 months. I have been running into this lately with young women.

My brain + probably my Game somehow casts a spell on them to where they confuse a sexy brain with a sexy body. Alas, I no longer look sexy. I am being attacked by an advanced artillery weapon called Time. I swear it’s better than Saddam’s Supergun. The last few years they’re not even shooting shells anymore. They feel more like Scud missiles. Over the next couple of decades, I assume I will start getting hit by even more advanced weaponry, even tactical nukes. They shoot the damn nukes at you for ten years, and then it’s nuclear winter, and you drop. And they have the audacity to call that shit “golden years”! Golden years my ass!

I may still have some good looks. Women my age say I look fantastic. I have 45 years of Game under my belt, so that’s got to count for something. And lately I have been either acquiring or faking some minor fame and status. Power is a cruel joke. Money is an afterthought. But you don’t need them anyway. You don’t need all four factors below and Factors 1-4 tend to bleed together anyway in endless circling arguments and cycles like vines of ivy. At some point, it’s hard to tease them apart or even say what’s what. I would call all of 1-4 something like “Macro Status Factor.” Face it, all 1-4 bleeds into this beast called Status.

I would say that yes, brains can get you laid if they are combined with Looks and Game. Brains then would be an “additive factor.” And it would help if your brains tended more towards the creative side as opposed to some dry number cruncher because artistic genius makes women’s bellies tingle. Also the Brains would probably have to be combined with Looks + Game both. Either one alone won’t cut it. Looks + Brains doesn’t seem like it will cut it. Game + Brains doesn’t seem like it will do much good either. But I could be wrong. YMMV.

So Brains/Artistic Talent/Creative Genius alone? Not really.

But Brains/Artistic Talent/Creative Genius as additive factor? I would say so.

We know full well that you need:

  1. Money
  2. Fame
  3. Power
  4. Status
  5. Looks
  6. Game

to get women.

Barring the first four, you absolutely you need 5 and 6. Either 5 or 6 alone don’t really cut it. And if you obviously have only 5 and 6, any scrapings of 1-4 you can get are great. You can even fake it.

Additive factor(s):

  1. “Brains factor”

Into this brains factor goes the whole mess called IQ, your “created mind”, artistry, creativity, genius.

And speaking of things marrying into each other, this Brains Factor, if cultivated well enough, can indeed form a part of your Game in a sense.

3 Comments

Filed under Gender Studies, Heterosexuality, Intelligence, Man World, Psychology, Romantic Relationships, Sex, Writing

PUA/Game: Women Love Writers

Yes, women (and girls) love to fuck writers. Bukowski said that, but he was not the first. We are romantics, you know. Artist types are romantic and romantic artist types set off the romantic drive that underlies the love instinct in females. Thing is you have to be good. Yes, women love writers, but my observation is that the only writers I have known who got women from their writing were damn good.

And they were usually writing some sort of literary type writing, either novels, short stories, poetry or literary nonfiction. Even a good journalist can get women if your prose really sings, say a music reviewer. If you are a writer but you don’t write well, I don’t think you will get women from your writing. It’s probably like that with any art. Yes, musicians, artists, writers, etc. can all get women, but only if they are damn good. If you are creative but you are not damn good, I don’t think it works to get women.

PS, when a woman tells a writer, “Oh! I love the way you write!” Um, that usually means she wants you. She’s in love with you or she wants to fuck you. Pretty much always. It doesn’t matter which because those two things are all jumbled up in females anyway.

2 Comments

Filed under Art, Gender Studies, Literature, Man World, Psychology, Romantic Relationships, Writing

The System of Nature: or The Laws of the Moral and Physical World, by Paul Henri Thiry d’Holbach

I have never heard of this early French philosopher, nor have I heard of his monumental doorstop of a book, quoted in the title.

The prose below is from 1773, and I doubt if anyone can write better today. I think this shows that our brains are about as smart now as they were in the times of the Revolutionary War at least in terms of raw IQ or brain speed. In fact, some studies have shown that Victorians had dramatically faster brains than we do (by reaction time). So the suspicions of us cynics may be true after all – of course we are getting stupider. Just look around you. How can it not be so?

Knowledge is one thing and intelligence is another. Intelligence is probably defined best as a measure of raw brain speed. The faster the brain, the more intelligent the person is.

Knowledge is another matter altogether and is more related to culture. For instance, we are much smarter now than we were in 1773 in terms of knowledge. We know so many more things and we understand the world so much better! We can make so many fancy things and solve so many difficult problems now solely on account of our accumulation of knowledge. So while we may be dumber than Victorians in terms of raw intelligence, we are much smarter than Victorians in terms of knowledge. The latter may well compensate for or even overwhelm the former. A fast brain is not a worth a lot if you barely understand the world around you.

It’s also useful to note that knowledge has nothing to do with intelligence necessarily. For all we know, cavemen may have had very fast brains. Brains in 1770 may have been even faster than in the Victorian Era. No one knows. We have always been an intelligent species. But while men in the Middle Ages and Dark Ages may have had brains that worked about as fast as ours, they were nevertheless not able to figure out the world very well.

Knowledge is more a matter of luck than anything else because ideally it is cumulative. With each generation or at least with each century or millennium, man has increased his knowledge and has managed to figure out the world better. Nevertheless, at the beginning the process is quite slow. Look at how long we lumbered along in comparative ignorance, even with presumably fast brains. This shows us that intelligence needs knowledge to be worth much of anything. Intelligence minus knowledge does not add up to a hill of beans. How impressive is a fast brain if it has the worldview of a caveman?

As I noted, knowledge ideally is cumulative. This is not always so, and there have been shocking histories of actual cultural and knowledge loss. The Tasmanians were separated from the mainland 10,000 years ago and afterwards they seem to have lost the ability to make fire and craft fishing hooks among other things. They may have also forgotten how to sew. So Idiocracy is nothing new. It’s been going on somewhere for at least 10,000 years.

Nevertheless, knowledge throwbacks are an anomaly because knowledge tends to be cumulative. It is also interesting to note that there seems to be some critical mass at work here. As knowledge gains, the acquisition of new knowledge seems to speed up somehow. Critical mass may well have been reached perhaps 100 years ago. Since then the leaps of knowledge have been spectacular. We now learn more in decade now than we did in a millennium.

Nevertheless, when it comes to the basics, we are hardly more competent now than we were in 1773.

Modern writers have not superseded the prose below; in fact, many cannot even achieve this 1773 level of competence. When it comes to certain things like the ability to write down our ideas, all of our knowledge seems to hit a roadblock. All of the massive knowledge we have piled on in the last century has not enabled us to craft better prose than the prose of 250 years ago.

I seriously doubt if your artistic skills have improved either. We now paint better than Michelangelo or Leonardo da Vinci? Really?

What about music? Are we really better musicians now than Bach or Beethoven? Really?

It’s doubtful that our psi skills have improved much.

Are our social skills really better now than they were in the past? Are you sure?

Are we better able to achieve psychological health than in the past?

Do we know any more about the mysteries of life such as the soul and death than we did then?

Has our philosophical knowledge actually improved? We still cannot surmount Plato and Aristotle.

Anyway, check out this awesome prose:

The source of man’s unhappiness is his ignorance of Nature. The pertinacity with which he clings to blind opinions imbibed in his infancy, which interweave themselves with his existence, the consequent prejudice that warps his mind, that prevents its expansion, that renders him the slave of fiction, appears to doom him to continual error. He resembles a child destitute of experience, full of ideal notions: a dangerous leaven mixes itself with all his knowledge: it is of necessity obscure, it is vacillating and false:–He takes the tone of his ideas on the authority of others, who are themselves in error, or else have an interest in deceiving him.

To remove this Cimmerian darkness, these barriers to the improvement of his condition; to disentangle him from the clouds of error that envelope him; to guide him out of this Cretan labyrinth, requires the clue of Ariadne, with all the love she could bestow on Theseus. It exacts more than common exertion; it needs a most determined, a most undaunted courage–it is never effected but by a persevering resolution to act, to think for himself; to examine with rigor and impartiality the opinions he has adopted.

He will find that the most noxious weeds have sprung up beside beautiful flowers; entwined themselves around their stems, overshadowed them with an exuberance of foliage, choked the ground, enfeebled their growth, diminished their petals; dimmed the brilliancy of their colors; that deceived by their apparent freshness of their verdure, by the rapidity of their exfoliation, he has given them cultivation, watered them, nurtured them, when he ought to have plucked out their very roots.

Man seeks to range out of his sphere: notwithstanding the reiterated checks his ambitious folly experiences, he still attempts the impossible; strives to carry his researches beyond the visible world; and hunts out misery in imaginary regions. He would be a metaphysician before he has become a practical philosopher. He quits the contemplation of realities to meditate on chimeras. He neglects experience to feed on conjecture, to indulge in hypothesis.

He dares not cultivate his reason, because from his earliest days he has been taught to consider it criminal. He pretends to know his date in the indistinct abodes of another life, before he has considered of the means by which he is to render himself happy in the world he inhabits: in short, man disdains the study of Nature, except it be partially: he pursues phantoms that resemble an ignis-fatuus, which at once dazzle, bewilders, and frighten: like the benighted traveler led astray by these deceptive exhalations of a swampy soil, he frequently quits the plain, the simple road of truth, by pursuing of which, he can alone ever reasonably hope to reach the goal of happiness.

The most important of our duties, then, is to seek means by which we may destroy delusions that can never do more than mislead us. The remedies for these evils must be sought for in Nature herself; it is only in the abundance of her resources, that we can rationally expect to find antidotes to the mischiefs brought upon us by an ill directed, by an overpowering enthusiasm. It is time these remedies were sought; it is time to look the evil boldly in the face, to examine its foundations, to scrutinize its superstructure: reason, with its faithful guide experience, must attack in their entrenchments those prejudices, to which the human race has but too long been the victim. For this purpose reason must be restored to its proper rank,–it must be rescued from the evil company with which it is associated. It has been too long degraded –too long neglected–cowardice has rendered it subservient to delirium, the slave to falsehood. It must no longer be held down by the massive claims of ignorant prejudice.

The System of Nature: or The Laws of the Moral and Physical World

– Paul Henri Thiry d’Holbach, 1773.

As an aside, while reading this, I kept thinking, “This describes just about everyone I know.” Although Holbach may have been thinking about other types of ignorance and another type of reason, the passage still rang a bell. After all, look who we just elected President. The triumph of ignorance over reason right there. Look at our entire political culture. It’s all based on cultivated ignorance. Where’s the reason? There is none.

The only reason or logic that Americans follow is the logic that leads them to making more money. If it makes me money, it’s true. If it loses or costs me money, it’s false. That’s the reason by which most Americans live their lives. Obviously this leads to a lot of irrational if not insane decisions because the thing that costs you money is often a more rational decision than the decision that makes you money.

Guess what, Americans? I got some news for you.

Money does not equal truth.

Loss of money does not equal falsehood.

That’s a most peculiar moral philosophy we have set up for ourselves in this idiot Yahoo Country.

I know few people who want or try to challenge their core beliefs, which I believe is what Holbach is ultimately getting at above. The original purpose of this site – “If I Am Not Making You Mad, I Am Not Doing My Job” – was not to troll the world but instead to force readers to throw more of their beliefs up for grabs. I was out to challenge just about everything you believe in. Why? Because that’s what you need to do. You need to throw as much of your beliefs as possible up for grabs, as painful as that is. It’s very hard to do, so most just don’t bother.

About the book, this looks pretty cool. It was originally written in French, so that translation looks really cool. I am not sure if I could handle 993 pages of that prose though!

15 Comments

Filed under American, Art, Culture, History, Intelligence, Modern, Music, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Sociology, Writing

Has Self-Expression Affected Your life, If So, In What Way?

Just met a new friend here who very, very smart. I have no idea if he meets criteria for genius, but he’s close enough for me. I’ll just call him my New Genius Friend, ZE. We are having a dialogue lately on creativity. His interests include the intersection of creativity and leadership and how one informs the other. His work seems to be mostly directed at the business sector where leadership training is often used and I would argue very much needed, though I have no interest in this sort of thing, mostly because I seriously suck as a leader. And I’m not sure I care about that at all because I hate the idea of leading people in much of anything, except maybe leading a herd of humans racing like scampering rodents off a steep cliff, and I might even have to think twice about that one, as momentarily thrilling as it sounds.

ZE: Has self-expression affected your life, and if so, in what way?

To me self-expression is my writing. For many years, I did not write. Now I write all the time, so I am expressing myself and my emotions to the whole damn world every day, with thousands of rapt listeners. God I love it so much. But I do not write to express myself.

I write because I have to or need to. This is a gift I was born with, and as with many people with gifts, I have been working like mad overtime on my gift for most of my life.

This is where people confuse giftedness and hard work. They think it is one or the other, but often it is both. Many people are born with a gift but then work, often very, very hard, on their gift for years or decades.

It’s my opinion that they get better at it, but I suppose that remains to be proven.

It’s a good question. Would I be just as good a writer if I picked up a pen now for the first time as opposed to working like Hell on my skill for years? I say no, but has it been proven?. It probably doesn’t matter because most with a gift secretly think they suck and always look to those who do the gifted thing better than they do. This makes them mad and insecure, so they are always trying to be better. I am always trying to be a better writer because I look around and see better writers all the time. They often make me a bit mad that I can’t write that well, so I kick myself in the butt for being a lousy writer and resolve to beat that guy if it’s the last thing I do.

Even if you could prove that practice is worthless, I think a lot of us gifted folks would do it anyways because the gift seems to compel you to insecurity and constant upward striving.

The most gifted people often secretly feel that they suck. This is interesting. Lousy writers don’t get blocked. Every blocked writer I knew was a great writer.

Also blocking is usually stupid. Blocking is caused by fearing that you can’t write well, which in the case of most good writers, is pretty much a lie. Once you sit down and start doing it, you usually see that the blocking was a lie, and you can actually do it well. This is because gifted people are perfectionists, but that is a rather good thing I think.

29 Comments

Filed under Psychology, Writing

What Have You Learned from Self-Expression, Whether Chosen by You or Imposed upon You?

ZE: What have you learned from self-expression, whether chosen by you or imposed upon you?

It was better when I chose it.

When it was imposed on me, I often did not enjoy it and felt I had been taken prisoner, often by a hostile force.

These questions are hard to answer, as I bottle stuff up inside. Even people like me feel emotion, but we feel it in our minds more than in our bodies.

My theory is that running from your feelings is the problem. I work in mental health, and increasingly I tell my clients to just accept their feelings and quit trying to run from them. If you feel sad, say, “Thank God for that feeling!” and sit there and be with it. The universe is about 1/2 sadness, and that’s on a good day! You may as well sit down and be alone with the sadness of life and the world, which is quite ample. Just be OK with it. Life is sad. That’s fine. That’s part of the experience of being here.

People panic when they are sad. My best friend is a young woman. She calls me up panicked that she is feeling sad, as if it is a terrible thing. So she wants to run from it. But that doesn’t seem to work.

Say I had a client who was in a bad marriage and getting ready to leave his wife. He feels guilty for being a bad father, for leaving his son, for all sorts of things. Normally therapists will tell you to stop thinking that, as it is irrational, but the thing is, you tell people that, and they are going to go ahead and feel it anyway. So I tell would him to just sit there and be OK with those feelings.

I would say, “Well there is a part of you that feels a need to have these feelings. Just sit there and have those feelings and be OK with them. I think after some time, you will get these feelings out of your system, and you might even get sick of them. I don’t want you to feel this way for too long – say five years would be too long – but you need to feel this way for so me time – even up to one to four years I would be OK with you just experiencing that as part of the process and then finally moving on.”

But the role of originality in creativity, I would say that to some extent they are one and the same. But the original thought is more your own as opposed something truly sui generis. And you borrow all the original thoughts you want to. And while you’re at it, you can borrow all the creativity you want to also. You don’t even have to pay to rent or buy ideas, concepts, metaphors, turns or phrase, figures of speech or even jokes and laugh lines. Just go ahead and steal em.

Come on, just do it! Look around, make sure no one is looking, and nab that cute turn of phrase. Stick it in your pocket real fast before the Thought Police can figure out what you did. Now move away quickly and stash that fancy little phrase in some safe place wherever you store your stolen verbal material. I would suggest a locked briefcase. You can try to put them in your mind, but lately just about everything I store up there seems to get lost somehow, but that might not be a good idea.

You can’t copyright words! Or phrases! Or even sentences, really. You certainly cannot copyright or patent concepts, ideas, theories or notions. It’s all up for grabs. I assume that the capitalists are going to try to figure out a way to copyright or patent all this stuff just so the sick fucks can make a buck off it, but in the meantime, it’s mostly up for grabs.

Plagiarism is not illegal, but it’s a career killer. I would advise to tread cautiously, but trust me, we writers steal stuff all the time. You have to be very careful how you do it, and when it comes to famous or popular works, you just steal a tiny bit here and there, better yet completely unconsciously.

We all gather information from everywhere all the time. We do not have to go around crediting everyone we grabbed some idea from. I sure as Hell don’t.

Incidentally this is part of creativity and originality. Grabbing stuff from other people. Look, there are not a whole lot of new ideas floating around. Humans have been thinking, talking and especially writing stuff down for 2,000 years. Hence almost all creativity, even most originality, is more or less rehash, but that’s the whole idea of it really. Just don’t steal too brazenly and you’ll be fine.

The truly great thinker is running about grabbing great ideas from as many people as possible in as many places as he can. He can then elaborate on them if he wishes or squirrel them away in which case, as long as he can recall them, he can rehash them, add or subtract to them, mix them with other ideas in all sorts of ways or combine them with other ideas to form new theories, patterns, ways of seeing, conceptualizations and especially overarching pattern-theories, which I call “putting it all together” and “seeing the big picture.”

Otherwise known as “wisdom.”

2 Comments

Filed under Law, Philosophy, Psychology, Psychotherapy, Writing

Is There Any Way to Sustain Emotional Self-Expression?

ZE: Is there any way to sustain emotional self-expression?

I think most people do it anyway because most folks seem to be pretty emotional. They go around expressing their emotions all the time anyway, unless you are getting at something different from quotidian emotionalizing here.

For me, to sustain it, I would have to keep writing because writing expresses my emotions best.

Humor is a good way to express emotions. As long as you are communicating with humans, you can make humorous comments that express emotion very well.

It also helps to be a systematizing thinker.

The more you can systematize, the more wisdom you obtain, and the best emotional expression is in the form of wisdom.

And art.

And then humor.

2 Comments

Filed under Art, Humor, Psychology, Writing

CP Story from High School

One of the players in the Delphi murders drama has been a young man named CP. Like so many people including yours truly,  he was briefly considered a possible suspect in the killings. I never thought  much of this theory. We quickly learned that he had a rock solid alibi for the time of the murders, as he was at Subaru at work. Along with his father, he was present at the search for the girls at 5:30 PM. He may have been part of the family group that came back at midnight and searched until 2:30 AM. Hence there is no way whatsoever that he could have been involved in this mess.

I will not go over the theory of why people thought he might be involved in the crime or any other criminal matters regarding CP. Other than a string of drunk driving offenses, there is no good hard evidence that he has ever committed a serious offense.

Some people are still suspicious of him and today I was sent a story he wrote back in high school where he turns into a murderous monster,  apparently to show that he had some homicidal fantasies or potential at least. People can investigate this P family all they wish. As far as I am concerned, they are all innocent.

Which leads us to a story that CP wrote in high school about him transforming into a murderous monster. I thought it was going to be some dark, disturbing stuff, but really it wasn’t. I really was not expecting much from this story and I was getting ready to cringe. I figured CP was a dumb redneck like the rest of  them.

Cody’s story here.

Boy was I wrong!

This is a fine little piece of writing! And my pet peeves, poor grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc. are mostly absent. He needs a bit of a light edit, but not much and good writers I work with a lot need about as much of an edit as he does.

I was stunned that this is a very good story! CP can actually spin a fine little tale and his writing style shows skill and smoothness. He kept the narrative going well and didn’t flash back and forth between tenses.

CP can actually write quite well, especially for a high school kid! What do you know.  I never thought he had it in him.

I have no idea how smart he is, but if he is intelligent enough to write well and construct this nice tight little tail, he’s as smart as he needs to be, and that’s all that matters in this world.

A lot of people out there are nice writers just waiting to unleash their potential.

A tip of the hat to CP of Delphi, Indiana for a job well done.

If you enjoy the hard work that goes into this website, please consider a contribution to support the continuation of the site. Donations are the only thing that keep the site operating.

1 Comment

Filed under Crime, Literary Excursions, Midwest, Regional, USA, Writing