Category Archives: Alawi

Modern Life Itself Is Conspiracy Theory

Conspiracy theory is life. Life is conspiracy theory.

Maybe Pynchon was right after all. Paranoia is the default operating mindset in our modern disinformation-polluted world.

At the age of 59, I have concluded that life or at least politics and geopolitics pretty much operates on conspiracy theory. in other words, modern life itself is in part conspiracy theory. The conspiracy theory is the truth and the lie is what everyone got told happened.

If you throw out all the “conspiracy theory” stuff, you end up with a lot of fake news. The world news people get is whatever the State Department, Pentagon and CIA want you to believe happened. Disinformation is everywhere and the Western press is more dishonest than Pravda in the USSR.

Every time you hear the phrase “conspiracy theory” or “Russian propaganda” go do some heavy research into what happened. I have done this many times in the last couple of years.

With regard to Syria and Ukraine, most of the  “Russian propaganda” was simply the truth. The fake news was whatever the MSM-CIA wanted you to believe. That’s right. The MSM is the CIA. It’s all one thing. The MSM is part of the Deep State, and the CIA sits at the pinnacle.

I was appalled at the outrageous lying during the war in Ukraine. The West’s lies were continuous and appalling. Syria was even worse. I do not think I have ever seen so much lying in a war before. We are entering and new era of Der Luggenkriegs (The Lying Wars). I believe most wars that the West is reporting on where the West has an interest will be characterized by a nearly unfathomable amount of MSM lying.

Look at the “conspiracy theories” for:

The death of Arafat. Natural causes. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. Actually poisoned by radiation by an Israeli spy working as his cook),

The downing of the jet at Lockerbie. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. Qaddafi didn’t do it and was set up.

The attack on the aid convoy in Aleppo. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. Actually a false flag attack done by a US drone and then blamed on Syria and Russia. 17 innocent aid workers were killed by the US in this false flag.

The downing of M17 in Ukraine. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. Neither Russia nor the rebels did it and not only was the plane not hit by a missile but there was no missile period. The jet was downed by a Ukrainian fighter and the investigation was deliberately delayed, botched and corrupted with a fraudulent final report.

The shooting down of the Russian jet over Turkey. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. Actually this was done in coordination with the US. We told Turkey 24 hours before that those jets would be in that exact location at that exact time.

US helping moderate rebels. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. In fact, US, Israeli, Saudi, Qatari and Turkish intelligence forces operate on the ground with Al Qaeda. There may have been a number of them caught in Aleppo at the end of the siege.

The chemical weapons attack by “Assad” on Damascus that killed 1,400 people. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. First the attack never even happened! There was no attack! The incident was a false flag attack done by Turkey and Al Qaeda. A small amount of sarin gas was released in the area by Al Qaeda,  leading to low levels in the  blood of residents. But the levels were so low as to be harmless. There were no 1,400 people. Instead about 400 people were killed, all Alawi and Christian government supporters who had been kidnapped from Northern Syria a year before. All of the dead identified so far were Alawi and Christian government supporting civilians who were kidnapped in that incident. They were killed by being put in a room with gas canisters leaking a toxin, perhaps carbon monoxide. Others were beaten to death, shot or had their throats slit. The symptoms displayed by the victims looked nothing whatsoever like Sarin poisoning. Instead they looked like carbon monoxide poisoning. A Turkish opposition parliamentarian is accusing Turkey of doing this as a false flag.

“ISIS” Suicide bombings of Kurdish Left rallies in Suruc and Istanbul. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. The government knew about both bombings and allowed the plots to go forward. Then police kept the injured from leaving the scene and beat up the survivors.

The “Gulen” coup in Turkey. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. There was no Gulen coup. Gulen had nothing to do with this. Erdogan lies like a rug! There was indeed a coup and Erdogan received warning of it some hours before but he allowed it to go forward to crack down on the opposition. The coupists were Ataturkist Turkish ultranationalist seculars. The US was also involved. The US put the coup in motion to get rid of Erdogan as he had started cooperating with Russia a week before.

Trump won the elections by winning the electoral collage, and all the polls were off. The “reported facts” were wrong, and the conspiracy theory was what really happened. Actually the polls were perfect.The polls were 100% correct. They predicted the popular vote well, and as far as certain state votes, Republicans committed mass election fraud in Florida, North Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin at the very least and probably in a lot of other places. Hillary actually won Wisconsin, Florida and North Carolina by ~2-3 points, more in Pennsylvania but less in Michigan. Real recounts were never done in any of those states. 70,000 votes in Detroit alone were not counted, apparently deliberately. However, even partial recounts found 26,000 fake Trump votes in Pennsylvania, 5,000 fake Trump votes in Wisconsin and 2,000 fake Trump votes in Michigan. And all of those were acknowledged by the states. Why so many fake votes and why are they all for Trump? They have been using those damn voting machines to steal elections since 2000, and they will do it forever until we stop them. It’s pretty hard to have an accurate poll when there is mass electoral fraud going on! Polls can’t predict fraud. The exit polls were far off from the actual count. Everywhere on Earth, that means electoral fraud. P.S. Exit polls started veering far off from results in 2000, when they put those damned computers in. The charge is being made by some of the US top statisticians.

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Republicans for ISIS

I have been checking blogs about the Syrian Civil War for some time now. One thing has become very clear. I now have a handle on what the supporters of the Syrian “moderate rebels” are all about.

Here is the profile of supporters of “Free Syria” and the “moderate rebels” including supporters of the “Free Syrian Army:”

They all and I do mean all, love ISIS. Every time ISIS succeeds on the battlefield, all supporters of “Free Syria” roar with approval. The also love the Nusra Front (Al Qaeda), Jaish al Islam and all of the rest of the Islamist groups.

Secular or nationalist groups make up maybe 10% of all fighters, but even they engage in the worst sectarian language such as calling the Alawi Nusayri. Nusayri is a vicious Sunni insult for Alawites and it has a murderous or even genocidal history and current project behind it. All of the secular or nationalist groups fight alongside the Islamist groups, in particular, they all fight alongside Al Qaeda or Al Nusra. So really all of the Syrian rebels are just Al Qaeda, ISIS, other Islamists or their close allies. Those are your moderate rebels for you.

They all hate Russia. This extends to general Cold War style propaganda against “Russian Communists” where Russia is conflated with the Soviet Union as all propaganda of the current Cold War 2 does.

They all describe themselves as conservatives. On these boards, all of the conservatives are cheering wildly for ISIS and Al Qaeda. So I guess conservatives love ISIS and Al Qaeda, at least in Syria, right?

Like all conservatives, they have an extreme hatred of liberalism and socialism. Anti-Communist language is very common, and Obama and the Democrats are called socialists or Communists as all Republicans do.

They all have an insane hatred for Obama along the lines and intensity of the Birther Tea Partier crowd.

The Chavista government in Venezuela is bashed on a regular basis as an example of the “failures of socialism” even though the whole economy is in the hands of the capitalists and obviously the fault for the shortages is 100% the fault of the Venezuelan capitalists. There are shortages of this or that product which is made or imported only by Venezuelan capitalists? Well gosh, then why don’t these capitalists start manufacturing more of that product, or barring that, importing it? The Venezuelan capitalists are fault out refusing to manufacture more of the products in shortage and they are also flat out refusing to import more of the products in shortage.

They do not like Trump one bit. In fact, they repeat the Economist line that Trump is the #1 threat to the world economy. Along with the Tea Party thinking, I would assume that these people are supporters of the US Republican Establishment – Ted Cruz, Jeb Bush, John Kasich, Marco Rubio, etc. All of them have voiced strong support for the Syrian rebels which in effect means that these Republicans are all backing ISIS and Al Qaeda. Trump is the only candidate who has questioned arming the Syrian rebels and he said Putin was right to go in and help Assad. On the Democratic side, both Hillary and Sanders have voiced support for the Syrian rebels – in other words, both Hillary and Sanders are supporting ISIS and Al Qaeda, at least in Syria.

Their line about Syria mirrors almost exactly that of the US government and the US media. I conclude then that the US government, both political parties and the US media are all supporting ISIS and Al Qaeda, or at least they are supporting them in Syria. Really the truth is that the entire US establishment is behind ISIS and Al Qaeda at least in Syria. There is a tremendous amount of evidence that the US is using ISIS and Al Qaeda to try to destroy the Syrian regime.

They all have an extreme hatred for Iran. They make a big deal about Obama’s supposedly poor nuclear deal with Iran. When they do this, they sound just like the US Republican Party.

They all use extreme sectarian language. For instance, they say things like there is a Russia-Assad-Iran-Hezbollah project going on right now to genocide the Sunnis. They sound just like the Saudis when they talk like that.

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The Chemical Weapons Attack That Never Happened: The “Syrian Government Sarin Gas Attack on Ghouta, Syria”

You have all heard that Syria was forced by Putin to get rid of his chemical weapons.

But you need to know that this whole demand was fake because Assad never used chemical weapons even one time in this war! Why did they make him give up his WMD’s? What right did they have to force him to give up his chemical weapons? He only had them in case Israel attacked. All those countries who made him give those things up were working for the Jews. The main people wanting him to give those up were the Jews because that was his deterrent against a Jewish invasion.

That Ghouta attack never even happened. There was no Ghouta attack consisting of Syrian artillery firing chemical weapons shells at Ghouta and killing 1,400 people. Anyway, there were no 1,400 people killed. That number was made up by Al Qaeda, who controlled Ghouta. Eight people out the “1,400 dead” were officially buried.

It was known that Al Qaeda was storing chemical weapons in Ghouta as 6-8 rebels had died in a tunnel in Ghouta due to an accident with chemical weapons a short while before the attack. Rebels were on record saying that Al Qaeda had chemical weapons in the neighborhood. A female rebel is on record as complaining that her until was being forced to handle chemical weapons and they had no idea how to deal with them and they were afraid of the weapons.

There was a Sarin release in the area, but it was released by Al Qaeda somehow in small amounts and no one knows how it was done. Some people in the neighborhood and some local rebels were proven to have Sarin in their blood, so Al Qaeda somehow released Sarin in the area and essentially attacked their own forces and their civilians in the area they controlled with poison gas. But the Sarin levels in their blood were were too low to do anything.

Furthermore, the videos of the “Sarin gas victims” in local hospitals show that the victims did not display any of the hallmark signs of Sarin poisoning, so no one died of Sarin poisoning on that day.

Instead the symptoms that the victims displayed looked like symptoms of carbon monoxide or hydrogen cyanide poisoning. We have video of the strange building where the victims were found in rows wrapped in sheets. You have probably seen those photos. The building is extremely strange. We have video of the basement of that building with green canisters all around the room. The green canisters have gas hissing out of them. At the time the video was taken, it was said that the canisters were releasing oxygen.

We do know that all identified victims are Christians and Alawites who were kidnapped from a village in Northern Syria the year before. So to believe that Assad did this attack, you have to believe that Assad killed 600 of his own supporters and barely even one of the enemy.

Al Qaeda and they other groups periodically conduct mass kidnappings of supporters of the Syrian regime, mostly Christians and Alawites. They haul these captives around the country with them. Sometimes they ransom them for money and other times they simply simply kill them. How is it that the only identified victims of the Syrian Army “Ghouta Sarin attack” are 600 Christians and Alawites from Northern Syria who were captured by Al Qaeda? Someone want to explain that to me?

So, yes, 400-600 people may have been killed in that attack, but Al Qaeda killed these Christian/Shia prisoners by putting them in that room with the hissing green canisters and releasing either hydrogen cyanide or carbon monoxide on them. A number of the “Sarin gas victims” also show signs of torture. Some of the men have obviously had their throats slit. There is a photo of six “Sarin gas victims” in a room, all one family of a mother, father and children. Some were shot to death and others were apparently beaten to death. One had their throat slit.

But supposedly all of these people were “killed by Assad’s Sarin gas.”

Can someone explain to me how “innocent civilians in rebel held Ghouta who were killed by Sarin gas” end up with sings of torture on their bodies, got their throats slit, got beaten to death and got shot to death?

Does Sarin gas slit your throat like a knife? Does Sarin gas leave you with what look like torture marks all over your body? Does Sarin gas somehow hit you so hard that you look like you were beaten to death? Does Sarin gas have bullets in it so when you shoot Sarin at people, they die of gunshot wounds?

Not one civilian from Ghouta was killed.

This whole affair was a false flag planned a long time ago by Turkey, the US and Al Qaeda. Al Qaeda did it with Turkish help, as Turkey supplied the Sarin.

There is audiotape on Youtube of an intercepted conversation between psychopath John Kerry and a Turkish intelligence official. In it, Kerry is Kerry urging the Turks intel guy to hurry up and get on with the false flag. He is recorded as asking them what is taking them so long. That audio is from January, several months before the “Ghouta Sarin gas attack.”

There were calls intercepted from the Syrian military and Interior Department that were intercepted by the Jews, but in those calls, the officials sound mystified. The media was reporting that “the Syrian military fired Sarin gas at Ghouta and killed hundreds of people.” The Syrian officials thought the reports might be true, so they were baffled and the Syrian military, Interior Department and intelligence were calling around asking, “What the Hell happened? Did one of our units use Sarin or what? Which one of our units fired Sarin shells at Ghouta?” As it turns out, no Syrian unit used Sarin on that day nor on any other day.The Syrian military was clueless and responding, quite logically, to media reports of a Syrian Sarin attack on Ghouta. The officials who made the calls were thinking maybe some rogue Syrian military unit shot some Sarin on their own despite having no orders to do so because there were no Syrian military plans or orders to fire Sarin on that day or on any day for that matter.

There have been a number of poison gas incidents in this war, but they were all done by the rebels, usually Al Qaeda. They would fire some Sarin and then immediately blame Assad and say, “Assad fired Sarin at civilians!” We know that all the attacks were done by the rebels because the Sarin was cheap, poorly made junk bathtub Sarin, the kind you cook up in a home lab.

Meanwhile, 100% of Assad’s Sarin had a particular chemical signature known to Western intelligence. No Sarin gas attack in Syria utilized Assad’s chemical signature Sarin, therefore no Sarin attack in the war was done by Assad. If Asad didn’t do it, that means the rebels did it.

Incidentally, the Sarin found at Ghouta was an exact chemical match for a batch of bathtub Sarin captured and confiscated while being transported by Al Qaeda in Turkey. They were caught with it by Turkish security forces, and it made it into the media. However, meanwhile Turkish intelligence (the Turkish Deep State) was conjuring up this false flag with the help of the US and Al Qaeda. One hand probably did not kno9w what the other was doing which is typically the case with the Turkish Deep State.

This attack was committed on the exact anniversary of Obama’s “line in the sand” argument where he said that if Assad used poison gas, his regime was history, and the US would go in and take him out. So Assad, in defiant insanity, chose the exact one-year anniversary of the line in the sand threat to seal his own death warrant. How ridiculous can you good? Look. Assad may be foolish, but he’s not stupid!

But think about it. Wouldn’t the exact one-year anniversary of Obama’s line in the sand threat to Assad to not use chemical weapons be the perfect time to do a false flag “Syrian military Sarin gas attack on civilians, and then blame it on Assad?

Obama was all set to go to Congress to get approval to attack Syria when the CIA told him that Assad’s forces did not fire that Sarin at Ghouta. They didn’t say who did it. They just said Assad did not do it because the Sarin did not have his signature. The CIA got this info from the British MI5. The MI5 studied the Sarin used in Ghouta and determined that it did not match Assad’s Sarin. So the MI5 issued a finding that said Assad did not fire the Sarin gas used in Ghouta that day. They didn’t say who did it. They just said Assad for sure didn’t do it. They relayed this information to the CIA who informed Obama that Assad did not do the Ghouta Sarin attack. That is why Obama canned his proposal to Congress for permission to attack Assad.

Even though the US and UK knew full well that Assad didn’t fire the Sarin that day, Obama and sociopath John Kerry continued to scream that Assad killed 1,400 people with Sarin in Ghouta! In fact, Obama and Kerry both continue to say this to this very day. They are lying through their teeth because both of them were informed by the CIA that Assad didn’t do it.

However, the US kept lying and screaming that he used the gas because they wanted him to get rid of his gas. This was an Israeli demand – to get rid of his gas. So when the UN ordered him to surrender his gas, the UN was working for the Jews. By getting rid of Assad’s gas, Assad was now completely naked and effectively disarmed and could be easily attacked by Israel without the threat of a poison gas attack in response.

Everyone was screaming for Assad to get rid of the chemical weapons, so Russia, who no doubt also knew that Assad didn’t do it, simply caved and pressured Assad to get rid of the weapons to get the international community off his back and mostly to fend off an invasion because the West was screaming that if Assad did not get rid of his gas, they were going to invade. So Assad just said screw it, caved and basically pled guilty to something he didn’t even do just to stave off an invasion.

And that is the story of the Ghouta “Syrian government Sarin gas attack on innocent civilians”.

Geopolitics is a dirty game! Sociopaths only need apply!

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Robert Stark Interviews Roman Bernard about the Paris Terrorist Attack & the Political Situation in France

Link here.

Now this interview is simply superb. I have never heard of this fellow before and he is connected with the Alt Right but I found that he had few if any objectionable views. Perhaps Europe is so Loony Left that Alt Right over there simply means “sane.”

He does have a very strong French accent, but it was just strong enough to be charming, disarming and even sexy but not so strong as to hinder communication. I understood easily 90-95% of what he said.

Great views on the politics and social structures of France about which I knew little. If you are into the politics and sociology of modern France, this interview is a must listen!

Great interview!

 

Roman Bernard lives in Paris, is the European Editor for RADIX JOURNAL, is in political communications and marketing, and is a former sports reporter.

Topics include:

The role that Paris plays as the center of power in France.
How Paris is a three-tier city with a wealthy left-leaning white center (where the attack happened), a 2nd tier which is mostly poor immigrants, and a 3rd Tier which is the white flight suburbs.
How Roman walked by the Bataclan Theatre before the attack and saw many of the victims and how he knows people who knew people who died.
The psychological processes Roman went through after the attack (human, anger, confidence).
How the terrorist explicitly targeted Whites and spared the lives of non-Whites.
How two of the terrorist were refugees.
The media’s myth that Paris was under total martial law.
How the police used the attack as justification to break into people’s homes.
How Prime Minister Hollande lied about the borders being closed.
How propaganda is more important than history and facts.
The Football scene from The Dark Knight Rises.
French football as a form of civic nationalism.
How Qatar owns the major football team in France, is hosting the next World Cup, is largely responsible for the crisis in Syria, and combines the worst aspects of Arab and Western cultures.
How Syria has a connection to Western Civilization due to colonization by the Greeks, Romans, and French.
The Syrian War as a racial conflict.
How the French Government is supporting the Syrian rebels against the Alawites who were allies of the French under colonialism.
The plans by the Western elites and Gulf states to dismantle Syria and build an oil pipeline.
Michel Houellebecq’s Submission which is about an Islamist takeover of France.
Demographic trends in France.
How the key issue is western atomization and that Islamization is the symptom of that malady.
The 2015 French Regional Election.
Marine Le Pen and the Front National.
How the Front National is a coalition of former socialists in the de-industrialized North and affluent conservatives in the South.
Why Roman views the key issue as national survival and that economic and social issues should be left to local regions.

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“History of US-NATO’s ‘Covert War’ on Syria: Daraa March 2011 Another Islamist Insurrection,” by Tim Anderson

This is an excellent article that lays out what I had always expected, that what everyone believes, that the Syrian Civil War started when “Assad” opened fire on peaceful protests, is a great big fat lie.

Here is what really happened:

In February, a true peaceful reform movement began in Syria. This movement had begun as early as 2005 and involved secular protesters opposing corruption and the Baath Party’s monopoly on power (Wikstrom 2011; Otrakji 2012). This was a legitimate movement.

These protests continued for some time, possibly a month, with little drama. The protesters made some early demands, and Assad quickly tried to appease them by making a number of the changes that they had asked for. But by the time he had made the changes, the protests had been hijacked by Islamists who were not appeased by the changes and insisted that the regime must go (al-Khalidi 2011).

Only one month went by before some teenagers were arrested in Deraa by local authorities for writing the North African-influenced graffiti, “The people want to overthrow the regime.” They were reportedly abused by the local Deraa police. Assad intervened, the governor was fired and the teenagers were released.

There were reports early on that either these or some other teenagers had been tortured to death by “Assad.” Obviously these boys were not tortured to death.  There is a confirmed report of one teenage boy who was indeed tortured to death which was widely blamed on “Assad,” but he was later found to have been killed by the armed opposition.

On March 17-18, violence broke out at protests in Deraa. The Western media says that peaceful protests in Deraa were attacked by government snipers on rooftops who started shooting the peaceful protesters. This is the line that everyone knows about. However, it is completely untrue.

What really happened is laid out below. There were protests in Deraa on these days along with large pro-government protests – the presence of large pro-government protests is another lie that is spread by omission by the Western press – the media says that all early protests were anti-government, however, even from the very start, the large anti-government protests were almost inevitably met by equally large pro-government protests.

Actually, the police at these rallies in Deraa were armed with only riot gear. Army forces were present, but they were not at the rally itself, instead they were on the outskirts of town. At some point during the rally, all Hell broke loose. Unknown snipers began firing from the Al-Omari Mosque. It is important to note that these mysterious snipers opened fire on both protesters and police.

Yes, a number of protesters were indeed killed and injured at these rallies, but quite a few police were also killed an wounded by these very same snipers. It is absolutely not possible that “Assad” would have mysterious snipers open fire on both protesters and police, killing both.

Why would “Assad” open fire on his own police, killing and wounding them? It is senseless. There is an interview with a Syrian police officer who was at that rally on Youtube in which he states that the police had only riot gear and that snipers shot both police and demonstrators. He  states the numb er of killed and wounded among the police.

It was later determined after police raided the al-Omari Mosque that the snipers were Muslim Brotherhood people firing from the roof of the mosque with weapons that had been smuggled in from Saudi Arabia.

In fact, shipments of these arms had been seized at the Iraq-Syrian border by border guards earlier. They had been bought in Baghdad and were on their way to Muslim Brotherhood people in Syria (Reuters 2011). The weapons were paid for by Saudi Arabia. It was these weapons shipments that were later used in the shootings at the demonstrations.

You notice that snipers opened fire on both police and protesters. This exact same thing happened in Ukraine when Maidan people paid snipers to come from Lithuania and open fire on both the Berkut police and the demonstrators.

As soon as the shooting started, other violence ensued. The same day that the mysterious snipers opened fire from the al-Omari Mosque, Baath Party Headquarters and the local police station were burned down (YaLibnan 2011, Queenan 2011). Medical teams came to the site to help injured protesters and police but were fired on by by the MB snipers. Members of an ambulance team and a doctor were killed.

Even several days after these attacks, Assad was trying to calm things down. Assad issued an order that live ammunition should not be used even if security forces themselves were coming under attack.

Funerals for demonstrators followed the killings in Deraa. At every one of these funerals, mysterious snipers opened fire on both police and demonstrators (Maktabi 2011). Once again, why would “Assad” kill and wound his own police officers?

Early reports mostly from the Qatar-owned Al Jazeera stated that it was snipers working for the government who fired on the crowds (Al Jazeera 2011b). However, these reports made no sense, as Syrian police would never shoot at their own people, and anyway, they were only armed with riot gear. The Western press soon picked up on the line that it was “Assad” who was shooting at the protesters and police.

Saudi government officials later confirmed that the Saudi government has sent arms to the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood and that Saudi arms had been used by shooters at the al-Omari Mosque (Truth Syria 2012).

Only a week later, the “peaceful protesters” were already heavily armed and were carrying out attacks on the army. An army patrol was ambushed outside Deraa at the beginning of April only two weeks after the Deraa events, and 19 Syrian troops were killed (Narwani 2014). However, Assad ordered this attack covered up because he did not want to inflame tensions even further. For sometime after that, the government refused to comment on deaths of security forces.

The problem with the government cover up of security forces’ deaths was that while this cover up was going on, the Western media was reporting all of the deaths in this early conflict as “protesters” killed by the army (Khalidi 2011). In other words, if armed rebels killed 19 Syrian army troops at an ambush, the entire Western press would report this as “19 peaceful protesters were killed by the Syrian army.”

All through April, 88 Syrian troops were killed all over Syria by armed rebels. The government covered up all of these killings, and every one of these deaths was reported by the Western press as “Syrian troops killing peaceful protesters.”  The Western media blacked out all of these reports and simply refused to acknowledge them.

Reports soon came out, spread by the CIA-linked Human Rights Watch, that Syrian soldiers were being shot by other Syrian troops for refusing to fire on protesters (HRW 2011b). Even the extremely biased Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a one-man operation run by a Syrian exile out of London, said that reports of Syrian forces killing their own for refusing to fire on protesters were false. Nevertheless, the Western media was awash with reports of Syrian troops firing on their own who refused to obey orders to open fire on protesters.

The armed rebels soon set provocateurs loose to destroy and damage Sunni mosques throughout Syria. One jihadist from Tunisia admitted that he had been hired by the rebels to write graffiti on Sunni mosques saying, “There is no God by Bashar” (Eretz Zen 2014). This is a sacrilegious slogan made in an attempt to encourage Sunni soldiers in the Syrian army to defect. This interview can be found on Youtube.

By this time, there was a war on. Quite a few on both sides, both rebels and the Syrian army, were suffering casualties. Every day rebel sources gave a figure for the number killed that day with no explanation. Most of these deaths were of armed rebels and Syrian army forces, but they were all reported by the opposition as “peaceful protesters killed by the Syrian army.” The Western media followed suit and did the same, reporting all casualties of armed fighters on both sides as peaceful civilian protesters.

Since all of the many casualties among the armed groups were reported in the West as peaceful protesters, US officials began making loud demands that Assad step down because supposedly he was the one slaughtering all these peaceful protesters (Shaikh 2011, FOX News 2011).

For the next several months, every time a protest took place, armed Islamists appeared in the crowd and soon opened fire on security forces (Jaber 2011). Security forces would often fire back at the armed elements in the crowd and there would often be killed and wounded on both sides.

A vicious sectarian element was present in the protests from early on. By May, there were already chants of “Christians to Beirut, Alawites to the grave!” (Blanford 2011). Soon this sectarian chant was heard at every protest.

For the next year, Human Rights Watch (the voice of the CIA) and other liars reported that the vast majority of the casualties were peaceful protesters (Clinton 2011). In fact by early 2012, a good report showed that of 5,000 casualties, 50% were security forces (OHCHR 2012: 2, Narwani 2014).

The lie was spread, spearheaded by Human Rights Watch, the protests had been overwhelmingly peaceful until September 2011 (HRW 2011a, HRW 2012), when supposedly so many peaceful protesters had been killed that the protest movement was forced to take up arms to defend itself (Allaf 2012).

A Big Lie had been laid down. Even today, the vast majority of people who know about the Syrian Civil War say that the war started when the Syrian government opened fire on repeatedly on peaceful protesters, killing so many of these unarmed innocents that eventually by September 2011, the peaceful protesters were forced to take up arms as they had no other choice.

History of US-NATO’s “Covert War” on Syria: Daraa March 2011

Another Islamist Insurrection

By Prof. Tim Anderson
Global Research, November 29, 2015

 

 The following text is Chapter IV of  Professor Anderson’s forthcoming book entitled The Dirty War on Syria, Global Research Publishers, Montreal, 2016 (forthcoming).
arms-seized-by-Syrian-security

Arms seized by Syrian security forces at al Omari mosque in Daraa, March 2011. The weapons had been provided by the Saudis. Photo: SANA

“The protest movement in Syria was overwhelmingly peaceful until September 2011”- Human Rights Watch, March 2012, Washington

“I have seen from the beginning armed protesters in those demonstrations … they were the first to fire on the police. Very often the violence of the security forces comes in response to the brutal violence of the armed insurgents” – the late Father Frans Van der Lugt, January 2012, Homs Syria

“The claim that armed opposition to the government has begun only recently is a complete lie. The killings of soldiers, police and civilians, often in the most brutal circumstances, have been going on virtually since the beginning”. – Professor Jeremy Salt, October 2011, Ankara Turkey

A double story began on the Syrian conflict, at the outset of the armed violence in 2011 in the southern border town of Daraa. The first story comes from independent witnesses in Syria, such as the late Father Frans Van der Lugt in Homs. They say that armed men infiltrated the early political reform demonstrations to shoot at both police and civilians.

This violence came from sectarian Islamists. The second comes from the Islamist groups (‘rebels’) and their western backers. They claim there was ‘indiscriminate’ violence from Syrian security forces to repress political rallies and that the ‘rebels’ grew out of a secular political reform movement.

Careful study of the independent evidence, however, shows that the Washington-backed ‘rebel’ story, while widespread, was part of a strategy to delegitimize the Syrian government, with the aim of fomenting ‘regime change’. To understand this it is necessary to observe that prior to the armed insurrection of March 2011 there were shipments of arms from Saudi Arabia to Islamists at the al Omari mosque. It is also useful to review the earlier Muslim Brotherhood insurrection at Hama in 1982 because of the parallel myths that have grown up around both insurrections.

US intelligence (DIA 1982) and the late British author Patrick Seale (1988) give independent accounts of what happened at Hama. After years of violent sectarian attacks by Syria’s Muslim Brotherhood, by mid-1980 President Hafez al Assad had ‘broken the back’ of their sectarian rebellion which aimed to impose a Salafi-Islamic state. One final coup plot was exposed, and the Brotherhood ‘felt pressured into initiating’ an uprising in their stronghold of Hama. Seale describes the start of that violence in this way:

At 2am on the night of 2-3 February 1982 an army unit combing the old city fell into an ambush. Roof top snipers killed perhaps a score of soldiers … [Brotherhood leader] Abu Bakr [Umar Jawwad] gave the order for a general uprising … hundreds of Islamist fighters rose … by the morning some seventy leading Ba’athists had been slaughtered and the triumphant guerrillas declared the city ‘liberated’ (Seale 1988: 332).

However the Army responded with a huge force of about 12,000, and the battle raged for three weeks. It was a foreign-backed civil war with some defections from the army. Seale continues:

As the tide turned slowly in the government’s favour, the guerrillas fell back into the old quarters … after heavy shelling, commandos and party irregulars supported by tanks moved in … many civilians were slaughtered in the prolonged mopping up, whole districts razed (Seale 1988: 333).

Two months later a US intelligence report said: ‘The total casualties for the Hama incident probably number about 2,000. This includes an estimated 300 to 400 members of the Muslim Brotherhood’s elite ‘Secret Apparatus’ (DIA 1982: 7).

Seale recognizes that the Army also suffered heavy losses. At the same time, ‘large numbers died in the hunt for the gunmen … government sympathizers estimating a mere 3,000 and critics as many as 20,000 … a figure of 5,000 to 10,000 could be close to the truth’ He adds:

‘The guerrillas were formidable opponents. They had a fortune in foreign money … [and] no fewer than 15,000 machine guns’ (Seale 1988: 335). Subsequent Muslim Brotherhood accounts have inflated the casualties, reaching up to ‘40,000 civilians’, thus attempting to hide their insurrection and sectarian massacres by claiming that Hafez al Assad had carried out a ‘civilian massacre’ (e.g. Nassar 2014).

The then Syrian President blamed a large scale foreign conspiracy for the Hama insurrection. Seale observes that Hafez was ‘not paranoical’, as many US weapons were captured and foreign backing had come from several US collaborators: King Hussayn of Jordan, Lebanese Christian militias (the Israeli-aligned ‘Guardians of the Cedar’) and Saddam Hussein in Iraq (Seale 1988: 336-337).

The Hama insurrection helps us understand the Daraa violence because, once again in 2011, we saw armed Islamists using rooftop sniping against police and government officials, drawing in the armed forces, only to cry ‘civilian massacre’ when they and their collaborators came under attack from the Army. Although the US, through its allies, played an important part in the Hama insurrection, when it was all over US intelligence dryly observed that: ‘the Syrians are pragmatists who do not want a Muslim Brotherhood government’ (DIA 1982: vii).

In the case of Daraa and in the attacks that moved to Homs and surrounding areas in April 2011, the clearly stated aim was once again to topple the secular or ‘infidel-Alawi’ regime. The front-line US collaborators were Saudi Arabia and Qatar and then Turkey. The head of the Syrian Brotherhood, Muhammad Riyad Al-Shaqfa, issued a statement on 28 March which left no doubt that the group’s aim was sectarian.

The enemy was ‘the secular regime,’ and Brotherhood members ‘have to make sure that the revolution will be pure Islamic, and with that no other sect would have a share of the credit after its success’ (Al-Shaqfa 2011). While playing down the initial role of the Brotherhood, Sheikho confirms that it ‘went on to punch above its actual weight on the ground during the uprising … [due] to Turkish-Qatari support’, and to its general organizational capacity (Sheikho 2013).

By the time there was a ‘Free Syrian Army Supreme Military Council’ in 2012 (more a weapons conduit than any sort of army command), it was said to be two-thirds dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood (Draitser 2012). Other foreign Salafi-Islamist groups quickly joined this ‘Syrian Revolution’. A US intelligence report in August 2012, contrary to Washington’s public statements about ‘moderate rebels’, said:

The Salafist, the Muslim Brotherhood and AQI [Al Qaeda in Iraq, later ISIS] are the major forces driving the insurgency in Syria … AQI supported the Syrian Opposition from the beginning, both ideologically and through the media (DIA 2012).

In February 2011 there was popular agitation in Syria to some extent influenced by the events in Egypt and Tunisia. There were anti-government and pro-government demonstrations and a genuine political reform movement which for several years had agitated against corruption and the Ba’ath Party monopoly. A 2005 report referred to ‘an array of reform movements slowly organizing beneath the surface’ (Ghadry 2005), and indeed the ‘many faces’ of a Syrian opposition, much of it non-Islamist, had been agitating since about that same time (Sayyid Rasas 2013).

These political opposition groups deserve attention in another discussion (see Chapter Five). However only one section of that opposition, the Muslim Brotherhood and other Salafists, was linked to the violence that erupted in Daraa. Large anti-government demonstrations began, to be met with huge pro-government demonstrations.

In early March some teenagers in Daraa were arrested for graffiti that had been copied from North Africa ‘the people want to overthrow the regime’. It was reported that they were abused by local police, President Bashar al Assad intervened, the local governor was sacked, and the teenagers were released (Abouzeid 2011).

Yet the Islamist insurrection was underway, taking cover under the street demonstrations.

On 11 March, several days before the violence broke out in Daraa, there were reports that Syrian forces had seized ‘a large shipment of weapons and explosives and night-vision goggles … in a truck coming from Iraq’. The truck was stopped at the southern Tanaf crossing, close to Jordan. The Syrian Government news agency SANA said the weapons were intended ‘for use in actions that affect Syria’s internal security and spread unrest and chaos.’

Pictures showed ‘dozens of grenades and pistols as well as rifles and ammunition belts’. The driver said the weapons had been loaded in Baghdad and he had been paid $5,000 to deliver them to Syria (Reuters 2011). Despite this interception, arms did reach Daraa, a border town of about 150,000 people.

This is where the ‘western-rebel’ and the independent stories diverge, and diverge dramatically. The western media consensus was that protesters burned and trashed government offices, and then ‘provincial security forces opened fire on marchers, killing several’ (Abouzeid 2011). After that, ‘protesters’ staged demonstrations in front of the al-Omari mosque but were in turn attacked.

The Syrian government, on the other hand, said there were unprovoked attacks on security forces, killing police and civilians, along with the burning of government offices. There was foreign corroboration of this account. While its headline blamed security forces for killing ‘protesters’, the British Daily Mail (2011) showed pictures of AK47 rifles and hand grenades that security forces had recovered after storming the al-Omari mosque.

The paper noted reports that ‘an armed gang’ had opened fire on an ambulance, killing ‘a doctor, a paramedic and a policeman’. Media channels in neighboring countries did report on the killing of Syrian police on 17-18 March.

On 21 March a Lebanese news report observed that ‘Seven policemen were killed during clashes between the security forces and protesters in Syria’ (YaLibnan 2011), while an Israel National News report said ‘Seven police officers and at least four demonstrators in Syria have been killed … and the Baath Party Headquarters and courthouse were torched’ (Queenan 2011). These police had been targeted by rooftop snipers.

Even in these circumstances the Government was urging restraint and attempting to respond to the political reform movement. President Assad’s adviser, Dr. Bouthaina Shaaban, told a news conference that the President had ordered ‘that live ammunition should not be fired, even if the police, security forces or officers of the state were being killed’.

Assad proposed to address the political demands such as the registration of political parties, removing emergency rules and allowing greater media freedoms (al-Khalidi 2011). None of that seemed to either interest or deter the Islamists.

Several reports, including video reports, observed rooftop snipers firing at crowds and police during funerals of those already killed. It was said to be ‘unclear who was firing at whom’ (Al Jazeera 2011a), as ‘an unknown armed group on rooftops shot at protesters and security forces’ (Maktabi 2011).

Yet Al Jazeera (2011b) owned by the Qatari monarchy, soon strongly suggested that that the snipers were pro-government. ‘President Bashar al Assad has sent thousands of Syrian soldiers and their heavy weaponry into Derra for an operation the regime wants nobody in the word to see’, the Qatari channel said. However the Al Jazeera suggestion that secret pro-government snipers were killing ‘soldiers and protesters alike’ was illogical and out of sequence. The armed forces came to Daraa precisely because police had been shot and killed.

Saudi Arabia, a key US regional ally, had armed and funded extremist Salafist Sunni sects to move against the secular government. Saudi official Anwar Al-Eshki later confirmed to BBC television that his country had sent arms to Daraa and to the al-Omari mosque (Truth Syria 2012). From exile in Saudi Arabia, Salafi Sheikh Adnan Arour called for a holy war against the liberal Alawi Muslims, who were said to dominate the Syrian government: ‘by Allah we shall mince [the Alawites] in meat grinders and feed their flesh to the dogs’ (MEMRITV 2011).

The Salafist aim was a theocratic state or caliphate. The genocidal slogan ‘Christians to Beirut, Alawites to the grave’ became widespread, a fact reported by the North American media as early as May 2011 (e.g. Blanford 2011). Islamists from the FSA Farouq Brigade would soon act on these threats (Crimi 2012). Canadian analyst Michel Chossudovsky (2011) observed: ‘The deployment of armed forces including tanks in Daraa [was] directed against an organized armed insurrection, which has been active in the border city since March 17-18.”

After those first few days in Daraa the killing of Syrian security forces continued but went largely unreported outside Syria. Nevertheless, independent analyst Sharmine Narwani wrote about the scale of this killing in early 2012 and again in mid-2014. An ambush and massacre of soldiers took place near Daraa in late March or early April. An army convoy was stopped by an oil slick on a valley road between Daraa al-Mahata and Daraa al-Balad, and the trucks were machine gunned.

Estimates of soldier deaths from government and opposition sources ranged from 18 to 60. A Daraa resident said these killings were not reported because: ‘At that time, the government did not want to show they are weak and the opposition did not want to show they are armed’. Anti-Syrian Government blogger Nizar Nayouf records this massacre as taking place in the last week of March. Another anti-Government writer, Rami Abdul Rahman (based in England and calling himself the ‘Syrian Observatory of Human Rights’) says:

‘It was on the first of April and about 18 or 19 security forces … were killed’ (Narwani 2014). Deputy Foreign Minister Faisal Mikdad, himself a resident of Daraa, confirmed that: ‘this incident was hidden by the government … as an attempt not to antagonize or not to raise emotions and to calm things down – not to encourage any attempt to inflame emotions which may lead to escalation of the situation’ (Narwani 2014).

Yet the significance of denying armed anti-Government killings was that in the western media all deaths were reported as (a) victims of the Army and (b) civilians. For well over six months, whenever a body count was mentioned in the international media, it was usually considered acceptable to suggest these were all ‘protesters’ killed by the Syrian Army.

For example, a Reuters report on 24 March said Daraa’s main hospital had received ‘the bodies of at least 37 protesters killed on Wednesday’ (Khalidi 2011). Notice that all the dead had become ‘protesters’ despite earlier reports on the killing of a number of police and health workers.

Another nineteen soldiers were gunned down on 25 April, also near Daraa. Narwani obtained their names and details from Syria’s Defence Ministry and corroborated these details from another document from a non-government source. Throughout April 2011, she calculates that eighty-eight Syrian soldiers were killed ‘by unknown shooters in different areas across Syria’ (Narwani 2014).

She went on to refute claims that the soldiers killed were ‘defectors’ shot by the Syrian army for refusing to fire on civilians. Human Rights Watch, referring to interviews with 50 unnamed ‘activists’, claimed that soldiers killed at this time were all ‘defectors’, murdered by the Army (HRW 2011b).

Yet the funerals of loyal officers shown on the internet at that time were distinct. Even Rami Abdul Rahman (the SOHR), keen to blame the Army for killing civilians, said ‘this game of saying the Army is killing defectors for leaving – I never accepted this’ (Narwani 2014). Nevertheless the highly charged reports were confusing.

The violence spread north with the assistance of Islamist fighters from Lebanon, reaching Baniyas and areas around Homs. On 10 April nine soldiers were shot in a bus ambush in Baniyas. In Homs, on April 17, General Abdo Khodr al-Tallawi was killed with his two sons and a nephew, and Syrian commander Iyad Kamel Harfoush was gunned down near his home.

Two days later, off-duty Colonel Mohammad Abdo Khadour was killed in his car (Narwani 2014). North American commentator Joshua Landis (2011a) reported the death of his wife’s cousin, one of the soldiers in Baniyas. These were not the only deaths but I mention them because most western media channels maintain the fiction to this day that there was no Islamist insurrection and the ‘peaceful protesters’ did not pick up arms until September 2011.

Al Jazeera, the principal Middle East media channel backing the Muslim Brotherhood, blacked out these attacks and also the reinforcement provided by armed foreigners.

Former Al Jazeera journalist Ali Hashem was one of many who resigned from the Qatar-owned station (RT 2012), complaining of deep bias over their presentation of the violence in Syria. Hashem had footage of armed men arriving from Lebanon, but this was censored by his Qatari managers. ‘In a resignation letter I was telling the executive … it was like nothing was happening in Syria.’ He thought the ‘Libyan revolution’ was the turning point for Al Jazeera, marking the end of its standing as a credible media group (Hashem 2012).

Provocateurs were at work. Tunisian jihadist ‘Abu Qusay’ later admitted he had been a prominent ‘Syrian rebel’ charged with ‘destroying and desecrating Sunni mosques’, including by scrawling the graffiti ‘There is no God but Bashar’, a blasphemy to devout Muslims. This was then blamed on the Syrian Army with the aim of creating Sunni defections from the Army. ‘Abu Qusay’ had been interviewed by foreign journalists who did not notice by his accent that he was not Syrian (Eretz Zen 2014).

US Journalist Nir Rosen, whose reports were generally critical of the Syrian Government, also attacked the western consensus over the early violence:

The issue of defectors is a distraction. Armed resistance began long before defections started … Every day the opposition gives a death toll, usually without any explanation … Many of those reported killed are in fact dead opposition fighters but … described in reports as innocent civilians killed by security forces … and every day members of the Syrian Army, security agencies … are also killed by anti-regime fighters (Rosen 2012).

A language and numbers game was being played to delegitimize the Syrian Government (‘The Regime’) and the Syrian Army (‘Assad loyalists’), suggesting they were responsible for all the violence. Just as NATO forces were bombing Libya with the aim of overthrowing the Libyan Government, US officials began to demand that President Assad step down.

The Brookings Institution (Shaikh 2011) claimed the President had ‘lost the legitimacy to remain in power in Syria’. US Senators John McCain, Lindsay Graham and Joe Lieberman said it was time ‘to align ourselves unequivocally with the Syrian people in their peaceful demand for a democratic government’ (FOX News 2011). Another ‘regime change’ campaign was out in the open.

In June, US Secretary of State Hilary Clinton dismissed the idea that ‘foreign instigators’ had been at work, saying that ‘the vast majority of casualties have been unarmed civilians’ (Clinton 2011). In fact, as Clinton knew very well, her Saudi Arabian allies had armed extremists from the very beginning. Her casualty assertion was also wrong.

The United Nations (which would later abandon its body count) estimated from several sources that by early 2012, there were more than 5,000 casualties and that deaths in the first year of conflict included 478 police and 2,091 from the military and security forces (OHCHR 2012: 2; Narwani 2014). That is, more than half the casualties in the first year were those of the Syrian security forces.

That independent calculation was not reflected in western media reports. Western groups such as Human Rights Watch along with US columnists (e.g. Allaf 2012) continued to claim even after the early 2012 defeat of the sectarian Farouq-FSA in Homs and well into 2012 that Syrian security forces had been massacring ‘unarmed protesters’, that the Syrian people ‘had no choice’ but to take up arms, and that this ‘protest movement’ had been ‘overwhelmingly peaceful until September 2011’ (HRW 2011a, HRW 2012). The evidence cited above shows that this story was quite false.

In fact, the political reform movement had been driven off the streets by Salafi-Islamist gunmen, over the course of March and April. For years opposition groups had agitated against corruption and the Ba’ath Party monopoly.

However most did not want destruction of what was a socially inclusive if authoritarian state, and most were against both the sectarian violence and the involvement of foreign powers. They backed Syria’s protection of minorities, the relatively high status of women and the country’s free education and health care, while opposing the corrupt networks and the feared political police (Wikstrom 2011; Otrakji 2012).

In June reporter Hala Jaber (2011) observed that about five thousand people turned up for a demonstration at Ma’arrat al-Numan, a small town in northwest Syria, between Aleppo and Hama. She says several ‘protesters’ had been shot the week before, while trying to block the road between Damascus and Aleppo. After some negotiations which reduced the security forces in the town, ‘men with heavy beards in cars and pick-ups with no registration plates’ with ‘rifles and rocket-propelled grenades’ began shooting at the reduced numbers of security forces.

A military helicopter was sent to support the security forces. After this clash ‘four policemen and 12 of their attackers were dead or dying. Another 20 policemen were wounded’. Officers who escaped the fight were hidden by some of the tribal elders who had participated in the original demonstration. When the next ‘demonstration for democracy’ took place, the following Friday, ‘only 350 people turned up’, mostly young men and some bearded militants (Jaber 2011). Five thousand protesters had been reduced to 350 after the open Salafist attacks.

After months of media manipulations disguising the Islamist insurrection, Syrians such as Samer al Akhras, a young man from a Sunni family who used to watch Al Jazeera because he preferred it to state TV became convinced to back the Syrian government. He saw first-hand the fabrication of reports on Al Jazeera and wrote, in late June 2011:

I am a Syrian citizen and I am a human. After 4 months of your fake freedom … You say peaceful demonstration and you shoot our citizen. From today … I am [now] a Sergeant in the Reserve Army. If I catch anyone … in any terrorist organization working on the field in Syria I am gonna shoot you as you are shooting us. This is our land not yours, the slaves of American fake freedom (al Akhras 2011).

References:

Abouzeid, Rania (2011) ‘Syria’s Revolt, how graffiti stirred an uprising’, Time, 22 March.

Al Akhras, Samer (2011) ‘Syrian Citizen’, Facebook, 25 June, online: https://www.facebook.com/notes/sam-al-akhras/syrian-citizen/241770845834062?pnref=story

Al Jazeera (2011a) ‘Nine killed at Syria funeral processions’, 23 April, online: http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2011/04/20114231169587270.html.

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Al-Shaqfa, Muhammad Riyad (2011) ‘Muslim Brotherhood Statement about the so-called ‘Syrian Revolution’’, General supervisor for the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood, statement of 28 March, online at: http://truthsyria.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/muslim-brotherhood-statement-about-the-so-called-syrian-revolution/.

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Chossudovsky, Michel (2011) ‘Syria: who is behind the protest movement? Fabricating a pretext for US-NATO ‘Humanitarian Intervention’’, Global Research, 3 May, online: http://www.globalresearch.ca/syria-who-is-behind-the-protest-movement-fabricating-a-pretext-for-a-us-nato-humanitarian-intervention/24591.

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Draitser, Eric (2012) ‘Unmasking the Muslim Brotherhood: Syria, Egypt and beyond’, Global Research, 12 December, online: http://www.globalresearch.ca/unmasking-the-muslim-brotherhood-syria-egypt-and-beyond/5315406

Eretz Zen (2014) ‘Tunisian Jihadist Admits: We Destroyed & Desecrated Mosques in Syria to Cause Defections in Army’, Youtube interview, 16 March, online: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQ8awN8GLAk

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Hashem, Ali (2012) ‘Al Jazeera Journalist Explains Resignation over Syria and Bahrain Coverage’, The Real News, 20 March, online: http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=8106

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Landis, Joshua (2011b) ‘Syria’s Opposition Faces an Uncertain Future’, Syria Comment, 26 June, online: http://www.joshualandis.com/blog/syrias-opposition-faces-an-uncertain-future/.

MEMRITV (2011) ‘Syrian Sunni Cleric Threatens: “We Shall Mince [The Alawites] in Meat Grinders”‘, YouTube, 13 July, online: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bwz8i3osHww.

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Facts about the “Free Syrian Army”

The name Free Syrian Army or FSA is often tossed about as a group of moderates or seculars the US should support in trying to overthrow Assad. There are claims that the FSA has up to 50,000 fighters. This cannot possibly be the case, but they may have as many as 20,000. Only 10% of the Syrian rebels consist of the FSA. The other 90% are Islamist jihadis of all types. 90% of the weapons that the US gives to the FSA actually end up with the real jihadis, usually Al-Nusra, the Al Qaeda faction in Syria. So most US weaponry given to Syrian rebels ends up with Al Qaeda.

The FSA is viciously sectarian, and even the most secular and moderate group of them all refers to Alawites by the pejorative term “Nusairis.”

When the FSA took over the city of Homs, one of the first things that they did was to evict all of the city’s 50,000 Christians. Whenever any rebel group, FSA or jihadi, takes over a town, they destroy or burn down any churches in town. The FSA, along with Al-Nusra, took part in a savage massacre of Christians in which ~50 Christians, including women and children, where slaughtered in vicious ways. The Syrian Christians very much dislike the FSA and say they are radical Muslims who persecute Christians.

There have been many massacres in this war. What happens is that some armed force enters a town, rounds up all the civilians and kills them or goes door to door and kills them. They are often killed in terrible ways and also mutilated. After the massacre occurs, the rebels, often the FSA, announce that Assad’s forces committed the massacre. However, it is mostly Alawites, Christians and Syrians who support the regime who are being slaughtered in these massacres. There is no reason for the Assad regime to kill anyone in those three categories, as those are its supporters.

Reports afterwards are often conflicting, but investigators have learned that all or nearly all of these village massacres were done by the rebels and few if any were done by the Syrian Arab Army or SAA. The FSA, either alone or with Al-Nusra, was the guilty party in most of these horrific massacres.

There is a striking similarity to these massacres which bear an uncanny resemblance to the ways that the GIA takfiri jihadis in Algeria were slaughtering villagers in the Algerian Civil War of the 1990’s.

Assad is still being charged by the Western press with committing a lot of these massacres when he probably committed none of them. The reason that Assad probably did not do even one of these massacres is not because Assad is a nice guy. He’s clearly not. But when the regime violates human rights, they don’t go into villages and slaughter all of the civilians.

Instead they drop barrel bombs on cities, carry out drive by assassinations, or arrest people and then beat or torture them to death, often in military prisons. That’s the way they do it.

There is no way that the FSA is anywhere near as secular as Assad. If any rebel coalition took power, Syria could become a much less secular place.

Many FSA members, after being trained and armed by the US, left the FSA and joined Al-Nusra, ISIS or one of the other jihadi groups. Furthermore, many of the jihadi groups are constantly rebranding themselves as “FSA” in order to get legitimacy. The FSA doesn’t even really exist. There is no overall command structure. Instead the FSA is simply a number of fighting groups who happen to call themselves FSA. If you call yourself FSA, then you are FSA. It is more of a brand like Al Qaeda than a coherent organization. What is “FSA” today probably will not be “FSA” tomorrow.

The FSA has been fighting alongside jihadis like Nusra from day one. In fact, most FSA groups are now part of factions that are led by Al-Nusra. So most of the FSA fights alongside Al Qaeda or is part of an Al Qaeda led coalition.

In addition, quite a few FSA factions appear to be jihadi wolves themselves who have donned sheep’s clothing in order to appear moderate and mostly to get US weapons.

The Syria’s Civil War subreddit is one of the best sites out there to keep you up to date on everything that is happening in this war. There are many FSA supporters on there. Their behavior is most interesting. Anytime any jihadi group, including Nusra or ISIS, makes any progress against the SAA, all of the FSA supporters cheer like wild.

Yes that is right, all of the FSA supporters on that subreddit cheer for ISIS and Al Qaeda.

The FSA itself is full of jihadis and at any rate often fights alongside Al Qaeda or other jihadis. Most FSA factions are presently under the command of Al Qaeda.

For those reasons, I simply cannot support the FSA. The FSA just looks like Al Qaeda or radical Islam to me.

As you can see, the moderate rebels in this fight are quite rare if they even exist at all.

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Another Frontline Hit Job on Assad

This time our intrepid reporter baits a pro-Assad militiaman. This man is in Latakia which is home to most of the Alawites in the country. He himself is either an Alawite or a Christian because he fears that the rebels will make sex slaves or slaves of his wife and kids. They are only enslaving non-Sunni Muslims, so that means that he either fears that his Alawite family will be enslaved or he fears that his Christian family will be enslaved.

It is true that there is heavy fighting now in the Al Ghab Plain where the government is making some progress. The government is at the west and south of the plain fighting east from the west edge and north and east from the southern edge. The plain is north of the city of Hama.

The government has indeed made some modest gains in fighting to the north and east of the south of the plain, capturing a number of towns. The problem is that the rebels are seriously dug in, having held these towns for a long time. Most residents of the Plain are Sunni Muslims. Fighting is definitely slow going here as it is in other areas, even with Russian air support.

It is crucial for the state to hold the Latakia region as this is where the Alawites live and if the “moderate” rebels break through they will massacre of lot of the Alawi.

The “moderates” have already committed many massacres all across Syria, mostly of government supporting Sunnis and Alawites. In fact, every time you hear about an armed group coming into a village and burning all of the homes and killing all the people, especially when they torture them to death, chop them to pieces or kill them in horrible ways, it was always the rebels and never the regime.

Nevertheless, the Western “free press” and the Western “free world” has blamed Assad for many if not all of these massacres, when in fact they were all done by the rebels, often the Free Syrian Army or FSA.

I have not heard of a single major civilian massacre yet committed by Assad. Not that Assad is a nice guy, it’s just that the SAA or even the militias simply do not go into villages and line up civilians and slaughter them. They do kill people, including civilians, but they just don’t do it like that is all. If the regime wants you dead, they will either kill you with a targeted assassination or they will arrest you, put you in a military prison and torture you to death.

The FSA is only 10% of the rebels. The rest are all Islamists. I doubt if there are any rebels as secular as Assad. Most FSA groups are actually Islamists themselves. A few in the south are not, but almost all FSA groups are under the command of Al Nusra or Al Qaeda. 90% of the weapons we give to the “moderate” rebels end up with the Islamists, typically with Al-Nusra. Even any FSA groups not under Nusra command fight alongside Nusra.

Even the few moderate groups are in bed with the West. They are committed to getting rid of Assad and putting in a pro-US regime in Syria just like all of the others in the Middle East. They probably also want to make peace with Israel like the other pro-US regimes have.

So even if you support moderate rebels and want to get rid of Assad, Syria will leave the Axis of Resistance which consists of Hezbollah, Iran and Syria at the moment, as all rebels are Sunni Arabs, and they all want to end Syria’s alliance with Iran and Hezbollah, as those those two are Shia, and all of the rebels hate the Shia and especially hate Iran. On the other hand, the few moderate rebel groups do not stand a chance or beating Assad, as they are so weak and few in number.

The choice really is Assad or radical Islam. That’s all there is to it. Almost all of Syrian secular society supports Assad. Polls of Syrian Christians show that 99% of them support Assad, and many have joined the various Christian militias that have formed. In supporting radical Islamists who kill Christians and destroy churches, the US is opposing nearly all of the Christians in Syria. I mentioned destroying churches? Yes. Whenever just about any of the rebels (even apparently the FSA) conquer a town, usually the first thing they do is destroy the churches, often by burning them.

The level of support for Assad in the capital is almost fanatical and has been compared to Soviet support for Stalin during World War 2. Whether this is due to regime propaganda or if it is due to people carefully analyzing the situation and supporting Assad on that basis is not known and really it doesn’t even matter.

The US position of waging war on both Assad and waging a fake war on ISIS is the height of sheer, utter lunacy.

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It’s Either Assad or Chaos, Hell and Genocide

Found on the Internet:

It’s often said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. If Assad falls and with him the government and the entire Syrian control structure – there will be no “happily ever after” where the “good and the moderate” form a democratic nation of unity. That never happens. Never. What does happen is slaughter (sometimes genocide), further war between “victorious” factions, and infighting followed by a failed state. The “good and the moderate” don’t get to be the kings of the ashes – that crown always ends up with the radical and the brutal.

There is no way to get rid of Assad and have a peaceful, friendly, moderate, democratic, human-rights oriented, pro-Western government take its place. It’s literally either Assad or complete chaos, much worse than the chaos we are seeing now.

It will be like Libya but only much worse. The forces in Libya only killed each other for several months in a war. That’s not a lot of time to build up hatreds. The Syrians have been going at it for four years in the most brutal way. Furthermore, there were almost no non-Sunni Muslim minorities in Libya. In Syria, fully 27% of the population is non-Sunni Muslim and 12% are not even really Muslims (if we say that the Druze are not Muslims).

And actually I think there will be genocides, especially of the Alawite Shia Muslims, who will simply be slaughtered en masse. There are 2 million of them to kill so it may take some time. There are also 1.7 million Christians in Syria, and I am not optimistic about their fate under a post-Assad regime. The fate of the 350,000 Druze is rather up in the air. There are also a small number of Ismaili Shia who would not fare well at all under a new regime. In fact, they will probably be killed.

And many Syrians support the regime – 70% in a recent poll. That’s 12 million enemy Syrians the new government will have to deal with. Al-Nusra often kills all government supporters when it takes over a town or village. The Free Syrian Army has done the same thing – massacring even whole villages of Sunni Muslims.

Even if Assad falls, I think a lot of pro-Assad forces will continue to fight for what the Assad regime stood for. Bottom line is even is Assad falls, the fighting will not end by a long shot. If we are lucky it will only be like Libya, but I am quite sure it is going to be much worse.

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Cruel People in a Cruel Land: Human Geography in Arabia

One wonders why a particular “megaculture” seems to have arisen in the Middle East where Druze, Alawi, Arabs, Jews and Persians seems to share a similar cultural mindset via diffusion, probably originally reflecting the nature of their homelands.

I am not sure what is going on here, but if you look at the region it is a pretty nasty area. Resources are poor and scarce. In resource poor regions, culture is often characterized by nomadic grazing, robbing and raiding cultures.

On the other hand, they can be extremely hospitable. This is probably also down to geography. We are talking about a desert here. In desert, what comes around, goes around. The inhospitable or selfish man is soon enough dead. Even if you are basically an opportunistic raider sort, you need to live by a desert code of kindness to strangers. Why? Due to a saintly conscience? No, due to your own needs.

Why must you be kindly and welcoming to the stranger wandering in from the desert? Because if you do not take him in, the desert is so harsh that he may soon die. Still, why take him in? Just to be nice? No. Because as you are a desert man yourself, you may soon find yourself in similar straits, wandering alone in the desert with only the kindness of strangers to rely on between you and the vultures. When you are wandering about in the desert, you want to be able to rely on hospitality to save your own life, so to return the favor in the interest of a general culture of needs-based reciprocity, you also take strangers in yourself, as you may soon be one yourself one day.

In the desert, you have your family, or you have nothing. There is no larger society. In fact, there is no society at all. Thatcher should have been born in the Najd. Yet the desert is a perversion and partial antithesis of Thatcherism. There is no real society, but you are a small-time collectivist, or you are a corpse.

Radical individualism in the desert will result in the deaths of all. This is why radical free market capitalism has gone over so poorly in the region. In this region, nobody wants this type of economics, not the Jews, nor the Arabs, the Persians, the Berbers or the Christians. Only the Lebanese Maronites, who insist that they are not Arabs and are instead Rome-gazing individualistic Europeans stranded in the Levant, promote Libertarianism and radical free-market economics. Everywhere else it is anathema. The Middle Easterner is a natural socialist.

Even the mindset of the Maronite is a conceit. Spend a bit of time around them, and in spite of all of the Europeanist posing and posturing, it becomes clear soon enough that these are children of Arabia as loathe as they are to admit it, and no quantity of statues of Mary will change that.

Hence families stay together for protection and form alliances against marauding strangers.

The desert is a cruel land, and it is not unusual for deserts to breed cruel and brutal humans. The Arabs are as harsh, unforgiving, cruel and brutal as the land in which they reside. They often show contempt for other living things – livestock get their throats slit, wild animals are often exterminated, plant communities razed – but in this way, they are only reflecting the desert itself. The desert itself kills the domestic and wild animals and wild plants that live there without even trying. In fact, the desert itself is a deathtrap, a sinkhole of murder and bones. The desert is a killer. That place isn’t even trying to keep you alive. The desert is trying to kill just about anything in it.

Anything surviving in the desert is there by wiles alone and not by the grace of the land. Hence the wily Arab, still alive and aging well in the blazing, blowing dunes.

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On the Civil War in Syria

Still wondering who to support?

From the Internet:

1. FSA/SNC puppets and bitches of the West, and if they win in Syria, they will turn Syria into another Western proxy state in the Middle East.

2. Jahbat al Nusra (moderate level retarded) or ISIL (high level retarded) who are in essence Khawarij, and if they win will turn Syria into a Taliban failed state shithole.

Take your pick son, an honest Muslim would reject both of these scum, and settle for:

3. Bashar Assad’s regime.

This is crucial.

As you can see, most Syrians seem to regard the FSA as pro-Western sellouts who will reverse Syria’s foreign policy and line up with the US and the rest of the West. Syria is one of the leaders of what is known as The Axis of Resistance in the region, including the Palestinian armed groups, Hezbollah, Syria and Iran. If the FSA takes over, they have sworn to sever all ties to Hezbollah and Iran (as the FSA are Sunnis and the former are Shia). Most Syrians do not want to sever ties with Iran and Hezbollah and are quite happy to be aligned with them.

Not only do the FSA have no support, they often work alongside the Islamists like al Nusra and the Islamic Army, and there are frequent defections of thousands of men at a time over to al Nusra or ISIS. Also most of the weapons going to the FSA seem to find their way to the hands of the Islamists.

The FSA are not exactly seculars. They have been involved in many massacres in Syria, often working alongside al Nusra and other Islamists. They like to chop off heads. There are many photos on the Net of FSA troops holding the severed heads of Syrian Army troops. Although some FSA supporters say that those photos are faked, they may in fact be genuine. The FSA also likes to slaughter villagers in very horrible ways. The Syrian Christians say that the FSA is the enemy of the Syrian Christian people. Originally there were Christians in the FSA, including an entire battalion. Now there are zero.

There was even an Alawite faction in the FSA. All of the Alawites have left and have lined up with the regime. All of the Druze and Ismaili Shia are lining up with Assad. The Kurdish factions are not Assad-friendly, but they are not fighting the regime either. There is a de facto ceasefire between the regime and the Kurds. The regime has withdrawn from Kurdish territory and has effectively ceded these lands to the Kurds at least for now.

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