Category Archives: Psychopathology

Self-Defeating or Masochistic Personality Disorder

SDPD or MPD is an interesting concept. It’s more than being a battered woman.

Ever heard of the guy at work who meekly says, “Hey, it’s Friday night at 5 PM. You all go home. It’s a weekend night, and you need to get home early to have fun for the weekend. Don’t worry that your work’s not finished. I will stay here tonight and finish up your work for you.”

His behavior is masochistic in a nonsexual sense. He’s going to suffer like Jesus for the sins of the rest of you (not finishing your work). Don’t worry. You will be saved when Work Jesus finishes your work at 11 PM and trudges out of the office bleary eyed and alone. He doesn’t deserve to party. He’s on this Earth to suffer. He’s Work Jesus.

“You all go off and have fun now. I’ll just stay here and suffer alone. Don’t let me make you feel guilty or anything like that.”

Ever known anyone like that?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Mental Illness, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology

Passive-Aggressive Personality Disorder as a Valid Concept

This post deals with a concept called Passive Aggressive Personality Disorder that has risen, died and been resurrected a few times by the psychiatric community.

I read a recent article on Passive Aggressive PD that cheered on the fact that it was in the trash can now. The implication was that we are all passive aggressive sticks in the mud in one way or another.

Perhaps that is true, but I have met some people who are so passive-aggressive that they are frustrating, annoying, abrasive, exasperating and most of all infuriating.

You give the person a car to work on, and he says it will be done in  a week. It’s not done in a week, and he had all the time in the world. He is just being a stick in the mud as usual. You keep calling him. Three weeks later, you start to get angry. He completely blows up at you, as it’s you that are the problem, not him. The fact that it has been three weeks and he hasn’t even looked at the car yet is your problem, not his! He is outraged that you are such a terrible person that you bothered him about this. He is also self-righteous, as he thinks waiting three weeks for no damn reason was  completely reasonable!

You finally get the car back maybe six weeks later, and he “forgot” to fix a couple of things that he promised to fix. Whoops! He didn’t forget. He intentionally refused to fix them to get back at you for being reasonable and asking him to keep his end of the deal! We can’t have that! To this person, your concept of fairness is an outrage!

Now you look at the rest of the person’s life, and you see that passivity is the normal way of reacting with the world since a very early age. You go down the passive-aggressive checklist, and you check off at least five numbers.

This person is ill not because they are passive-aggressive. We all are, and if you ask some of my female ex’es and even current best friends, I am notorious, though I cannot see it. But the person above has become so passive aggressive that it is messing up their lives. In addition, it is starting to blow up a lot of their relationships, and as the anecdote above suggests, it’s probably getting in the way or making money. His passive aggression is turning him into a major asshole.

I would argue that this person is ill and that their personality is so disordered that we ought to diagnose it and call it Passive Aggressive Personality Disorder. I think we ought to bring back PAPD as a concept despite this dumb dimensional model that DSM-5 is forcing us to use.

Every met anyone like this?

Most of the other trashed PD’s are the same. I am certain that Depressive Personality Disorder exists. Someone very close to me is a textbook case. It’s quite rare, but it’s real. Sadistic Personality exists and so does Self-Defeating of Masochistic Personality Disorder. These two were thrown out by idiot feminist clinicians who thought that woman batterers would be labeled as ill with SPD and they would use it to try to get out of punishment.

They also thought that battered women would be prejudiciously labeled as SDPD or MPD, and this would be a blame the victim thing. Well, sometimes you need to blame the victim in sense. It takes two to tango. And many battered women would indeed qualify as SDPD.

I think you all know what Sadistic Personality Disorder looks like as most of you have probably had the misfortune of meeting one.

 

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Filed under Feminism, Gender Studies, Mental Illness, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology

False Memories in OCD

False memories are quite common when OCD gets bad. I have dealt with a number of people who were going round and round about false memories. They are not an extremely common symptom, but you do see them sometimes when the illness is bad. It’s generally a sign of a bad illness.

Ms. Z was periodically convinced that she killed people. She would have a conversation with someone for 5-10 minutes, then walk away ,and then suddenly think that she had killed them somehow during the conversation. Perhaps she had suddenly swung her fist out and beat them to death? Perhaps she had pulled out a knife and hacked them to death? Perhaps she had shot them with a gun? She would have all sorts of false memories of how she killed these people.

In the course of these false memories, she would become 100% certain that she had killed that person she was talking to in that store that day. In the next few days, she would ask around to people she knew if anyone got murdered or if she killed someone in the store that day. Of course she would always be told no. I’m sure her friends must have tired of answering these weird questions. As soon as she was told that no murder had occurred, immediately the firmly held belief that she had killed that person would vanish, and she would never think about it again. Until a little while later when she would be talking to someone again and then walk away and once again become convinced that she had killed that person…

Another woman, Ms. S., was a young college student. She was at a large California university that had a lot of long, winding trails with undergrowth. There were deep gullies on the sides of the paths that were overgrown with foliage. Ms. S. would be walking down the paths and as she walked, she passed all sorts of people coming her way. At some point, she would suddenly get an idea that she had grabbed one of the people coming her way and thrown them down into one of the gullies.

She had a pretty clear memory of who the person was she threw down there and exactly how she had done it. She would be overwhelmed with guilt, and she would take off down into the gully searching for the “body” of the person she had thrown down into the gulch. She did this on a pretty regular basis, and eventually the university wondered what she was doing floundering around in the gullies, and they sent the university police down there to see what she was up to. After a while, it become clear that she needed to go to the university counseling center.

In both cases, the women received a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder in addition to OCD. This was an incorrect diagnosis, and it was based on the fact that for a short while after Ms. S  was clamboring around in the gullies or after Ms. Z became convinced that she had somehow killed someone she was talking to, that both women were absolutely convinced that they had either thrown someone down into the gully or had killed the person they were talking to in the store.

The diagnosis was incorrect because as soon as the women were told that there was no one in the gully or that they had not killed the person in the store, the “delusion” completely vanished and they didn’t think of it again until next time. Delusions just don’t go away like that. It’s not a very strongly held conviction if can vanish with a mere word of reassurance.

We look at the whole process in a holistic sense. What is the nature of the process? Is this a characterological process (personality disorder), a mood process (mood disorder like Bipolar Disorder or Depression), an anxiety process (OCD, PTSD, GAD, Panic Disorder) or a psychotic process (schizophrenia, manic psychosis, psychotic depression, schizoaffective disorder)? It is important to look at things in an intuitive sense and get the “smell” or “feel” of what the basic process is that you are dealing with.

In the case above, this is an anxiety process, specifically an OCD process. It’s not a psychotic process, despite the fact that it superficially resembles a psychosis.

Some of these folks with false memories actually go to the police station and turn themselves in for crimes that they did not commit.

“Hi, I am here to report a murder.”

“Ok, what happened?”

“Well I think I killed someone last night.”

“You think you killed someone?”

“Yes.”

“Well, where did this happen?”

“I am not sure. I think maybe the bridge over the river.”

“What time did this happen?”

“I’m not sure. Maybe midnight?”

“Who was the victim?”

“I’m not sure. I think it was a man, maybe.”

“What weapon was used?”

“I am not completely sure. I think it was a knife maybe.”

After a while the police started to get the message. He was not there to report a murder at all. He was there to find out whether or not he was a murderer!

As the conversation degenerated, the man started repeating, “How do you know if you killed someone or not?”

The police did not know what to say to that. After he left, the police were talking among themselves. “That’s so weird,” one of them said. “What does he mean, ‘How do I know if I killed someone or not?’ How could you not know something like that? That’s so weird.” The cops were shaking their heads.

 

As you can see, false memories are quite common in OCD when it gets very bad.

I dealt with them myself at one point in 1985 or 1986. I have to admit it was a pretty nutty way of thinking. I was so ashamed of my false memories (which I temporarily convinced myself were true) that I never told anyone except for a couple of therapists. I have not dealt with any false memory nonsense in over 30 years, and I hope I never have to deal with that again. It’s truly a crazy way to think.

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Filed under Anxiety Disorders, Law enforcement, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, OCD, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders

I Am Now a Published Author

Here.

You can download my first published work above. I was published for the first time this spring in a book called:

Before the Last Voices Are Gone: Endangered Turkic Languages, Volume 1: Theoretical and General Approaches

This is the first volume of a four volume set called:

The Handbook of Endangered Turkic Languages

The first volume alone runs to 512 pages. Articles are in English, Russian and Turkish, variably. It was published out of the International Turkish-Kazakh University in Istanbul, Turkey and the International Turkic Academy in Astana, Kazakhstan. These are two campuses that are part of one joint Turkey-Kazakhstan shared university.

I contributed one chapter that runs from pages 311-384 titled:

Mutual Intelligibility among the Turkic Languages

It’s 83 pages long and has ~100 references. It may have taken me 500 hours to write that chapter. Tell that to my enemies who claim I do not work, ok? When all is said and done, I figure I may make 75 cents an hour on this work. But this is how academic publishing works. There’s just no money in it. It’s all a labor of love. In addition, most work is done by professors who have to publish as part of their professorship (publish or perish), so in effect, their professor salary is covering their publishing.

That document had to go through two rather grueling peer reviews. I had to make many changes in it to get it to publication. The second peer review had to get past the top Turkologists in the world today, and I am amazed that I made it through review to be honest.

Most people publishing in academic books or journals are academics, professors working at universities. There are only a few of us independent scholars out there (I am an independent scholar because I am not at a university). Also most folks have PhD’s, and I only have a Masters, but there are some folks with Masters publishing academically.

In general, this is a rather selective game where everyone is hyperspecializing as is the trend nowadays. Although my mentor at the project calls me a Renaissance Man, I wonder if the autodidact/polymath is an endangered species if not extinct. Everyone has to specialize nowadays.

For instance, common knowledge in this particular field would be that the only folks who could publish in Turkology would be linguists with a PhD in Linguistics, preferably with a emphasis in Turkology. Beyond that, they may prefer say 5-10 years publishing in the field of Turkology in addition to a professorship in Turkic linguistics. You can see where this is headed. I am not knocking it. I am just pointing out that microspecialization is the game now.

What follows is that since I lack the PhD or professorship or any background at all in Turkology, I should not be allowed to be published in this field, or if by some error I am somehow mispublished, all of my work should be promptly ignored as done by a nonspecialist who could not possibly know what he is talking about. Needless to say, I don’t agree with that, and I carry on tilting at windmills like a good deluded Renaissance Man who never got the memo and wouldn’t read it if he did.

The odd thing is that I knew nothing about Turkology until I plunged into this mess. I had written a short piece of mutual intelligibility in Turkic, as MI is one of my pet subjects and put it up on Academia on my scholarly papers site, and a professor in Turkey happened to read it. He wrote to me telling me he agreed with me, he wanted me to expand it into a document, and they would publish it for me. So off I went, down the Turkic rabbit hole. If you study the very high IQ types (140+), they tend to go on “crazes” like this. They also lose interest after a bit, drop the craze and move on to some new craze. Dilettantism for the win.

I also have an anxiety disorder called OCD which is well controlled. A good side of it though is that you tend to do dive down rabbit holes a lot, and the OCD makes you burrow maniacally into the rabbit hole with the notion that one is going to become the world’s leading expert on whatever rabbit hole you are digging in now. So for one or two years, I went absolutely berserk into Turkic, whereas before I scarcely knew a thing about it. The end result can be read above.

The sad result is that either due to the savant stuff or the mental quirk, I also tend to lose interest in my rabbit holes after a bit. I follow them about halfway to China, make several revolutions around the molten core, and after a year or so, come up for air gasping with incipient Black Lung, and next thing you know, I am bored, and it’s onto a new craze. It’s a bit silly, but we all have our crosses to lug, and as eccentricities go, there are many worse things that dabbling, er hobbyism, er dilettantism, er polymathy, er autodidactism, er Renaissance Manism.

Most of you will probably not find this very interesting, as it is pretty specialized stuff that is mostly of interest to people in the specialty, linguists and those interested in the subject. It’s not exactly for the general reader. But if you have any interest in these languages, you might enjoy it.

I expanded Turkic from 41 to 53 languages, eliminated some languages, turned some into dialects, turned some dialects into full languages, combined languages into a single tongue, created some new languages out of scratch and did quite a bit of work on the history of the languages.

I also reworked the classification a bit because I thought it could be done better. Even though this work does not pay much, the pay is in fame if it is at all. My work will either be accepted by the field or rejected outright or somewhere in between. I have already earned the praises of some of the world’s top Turkologists, much to my surprise. If I get fame, well, I get quoted in papers, maybe invited to conferences, and maybe even referenced in Wikipedia. There are groupies in all status fields, and what the heck, there may even be linguist groupies. If not, there are always starry eyed coeds dreaming of professor types to mentor them. I am already working that angle as it is. Writer Game, Scholar Game, there’s Game for everything.

Or my work does not go over and maybe the field decides I do not know what I am talking about.

Crap shoot, like most of life’s endeavors. Roll em, and wish upon a star…snake eyes!

PS. The title of the series, Before the Last Voices Are Gone, was created by me. I think it has a nice little song.

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Filed under Altaic, Anxiety Disorders, Comparitive, Europe, Intelligence, Language Classification, Language Families, Linguistics, Mental Illness, OCD, Psychology, Psychopathology, Regional, Scholarship, Turkey, Turkic, Vanity

Severe OCD: When the OCD Takes Over

Disgusting or Terrified?: Can intrusive thoughts turn you into whatever it is you are afraid of?

Does breaking your rules mean you don’t have OCD?

I’m afraid of…. Sometimes I’m scared that… I’m…I can’t actually type it. Think of the worst thing you could do to someone, and you are on the right track.

But I’ve been breaking my rules. I work with ____, and I don’t even think I should be near them. My job requires that I am around _____, and I feel like I am already a thing that is bad and may have done bad stuff but probably not but you never know. This is killing me. I feel like if I actually had OCD, I wouldn’t break my rules. Ever. Period. But since I have been breaking my rules I’m worried that I am actually ____.

Yes it is still OCD, if you break your rules.

I used to have all sorts of insane rules that I had to live by. They were secret, and I never told a soul. But I was terrified of breaking them. I slowly got up my nerve and started breaking them one by one. But as soon as I broke a rule, a new one would come in! Not as bad as the previous one, but still. It was like the illness was mad that I was breaking the rules that it set up for me, and it was retaliating by setting up new rules. Then I would get up some nerve and break the new rule. It went on and on like this. This was over 30 years ago when I was in terrible shape.

If the illness gets bad, the OCD pretty much takes over and even though you know it’s insane, it starts running your life. Your mind goes split between the crazy part (the OCD) and the sane part, and you end up with a war in your head like all such people have. But if the illness gets really bad, the sane part of your mind will slowly get weaker and weaker. Like it’s a voice in your head, and it gets softer and softer and quieter and quieter. At the same time, the crazy voice (the OCD) will get louder and louder. Eventually the sane side says, “OK, look, forget it. You win. I give. You take over and do what you’ve got to do. We are running up the white flag here.”

And then the crazy part takes over. It tries to screw up your life by making you miserable and saying negative things all the time. In my case, it set up all sorts of lousy rules designed to screw up my life and make me miserable. But I became convinced that this was how it was supposed to be. I had to suffer in all of these ways because the voice (the OCD) told me that I was the worst person on Earth, the worst person that ever lived. I actually became convinced that this was true for some time.

The craziness was very carefully calibrated. I remember I used to ask the voice (the OCD) about being crazy. “Well how crazy am I going to go anyway?” The voice would come back that I had to be crazy, that there was no alternative to this. This was somehow logical, don’t ask me how. It would say that the craziness was going to be completely invisible, all in my head, and I wasn’t going to do anything even 1% crazy because we had to keep the crazy stuff secret.

We were not going to believe anything too weird, and we were not going to see things. We were not going to commit any acts of violence, and we would try to be as rational as possible. Actually one of the Rules of the Craziness was that my actual behavior had to be as close to 100% normal as possible. All the craziness was supposed to be in my head. It was amazing how calibrated the whole thing was. It implies to me that I actually was not all that nuts.

It took me about four years to work my way out of this crap. It was like a journey to craziness. A trip to Crazy World. While I was crazy, I tried very hard to fix all sorts of things about myself that I thought were screwing me up in life, so that was beneficial. I was working full-time or in school the whole time. Most people figured out that there was something wrong, but the illness was pretty much invisible and all you could see was a strange or bizarre stare in my eyes along with a lot of anxiety. I didn’t actually do much of anything nuts.

Eventually after four years, it was like I just got sick and tired of it. It was like I took some sort of a journey that I needed to take for some reason, like I got something out of my system. Being crazy is pretty lousy, and if you have any self-esteem at all, you will get pretty sick and tired of it after a while and just want it to be gone. I also grew a lot as a person and changed a lot of things about myself that needed changing.

I had one other episode five years later in 1991 that was very, very bad, but I went on pills for the first time, and that dealt with it. I haven’t had any serious episodes like that in 25 years.

Even though I have not had any serious episodes in 25 years, I am still very much afraid that it will come back, and I will be like that again. But if you take pills, that seems to keep it away. Also it seems like you have to work on your head a lot, like all day,  every day to keep your mind in a nice, sane place.

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Filed under Anxiety Disorders, Mental Illness, OCD, Psychology, Psychopathology

Thank God for That Feeling!

Really the optimistic and pessimistic views of life are both true and equally valid. This is what you figure out if you understand the Tao. Pessimism is a part of optimism and vice versa. Most of the time, it is the best of days and the worst of days, both at the same time. And that’s ok. That’s the Tao. The circle is completed. Once you realize that life is both wondrous and utterly horrible, often both at the same time, you feel greatly liberated and you no longer fear sadness or depression.

The main problem is that we are always trying to run away from our feelings. We have bad feelings and we run around like our the back of our shirt is on fire trying to toss of the flames of hell in our minds. This problem is compounded by therapists who too often try to get clients to stop thinking bad feelings and feel good ones instead. Problem is this does not really work. Say your marriage is breaking up. Even if you were in an abusive marriage, it’s still sad. And many people mourn the death of their marriage.

Usually a therapist will urge the client to not feel that way and instead be happy that the marriage is over. This is useless because the person is going to feel sad and mourn anyway. Clients should be encouraged to experience their bad feelings. Just sit and be alone with them. Meditate on them. If you are alone with your bad feelings for a while, often you get tired of bored with them and you don’t want to feel that way anymore. What really happened is you got the sadness or mourning  out of your system. If you run from it forever, you never get it out of your system. You have to stop running some time. And when you stop, here come your bad feelings, coming right up behind you. No matter how fast you run,  your feelings will always catch up to you.

Just as it is axiomatic that  you cannot run from your fears, similarly I doubt if you can run from your feelings. Feelings need to be allowed to come into consciousness, accepted and processed. After a bit of that, you may get tired of them, and now it is time to move along.

I have clients that are often dealing with a lot of unhappiness. I deal with suicidal people all the time. I have had clients attempt suicide on me right in the middle of a counseling stretch. I have already lost one client to suicide, but he was deeply depressed, had already attempted several times before, and when I first talked to him, he told me had a “suicide machine.” He had rigged up some sort of a device to give himself helium in order to commit suicide. Problem was it did not work very well.

The NHS in the UK really killed this man because they freaked out unnecessarily about his symptoms which sent him into a suicidal tizzy. He went away for a while and a few months later, I heard that three weeks after our last session, he was swinging from the ceiling of his home.

Increasingly I tell my clients who are dealing with sadness, depression and bad feelings  to just go ahead and experience that feeling. I say, “If  you feel sad, say ‘Thank God for that feeling!'” and you can go sit down somewhere and just get into the sadness of life, which is about 50% of it anyway. It is a legitimate part of life and it is ok to experience it without fear. The real problem is that people feel sad and start getting frantic trying to make the feeling go away. Go ahead and experience your feelings. They won’t bite. They’re yours. There’s no point running away from them if they’re yours.

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Filed under Depression, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, Philosophy, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotherapy

Psychopathology of Serial Murderers

The primary problem with almost all serial killers is simply ASPD, Antisocial Personality Disorder, derived sociopathy or primary psychopathy. It is present in almost 100% of such cases. Most everything else is rather secondary to this primary character disorder, which is the most prominent symptom.

Very rare is the serial killer without this disorder, although there have been a few. I remember a long-distance trucker who turned himself when he walked into a Northern California police station with a woman’s breast in his top shirt pocket. He had camped out in forests while trucking and had picked up women and killed them. He kept the body of one in the truck for three or four days and drove around with it.

Experts said he was quite unusual in that they said he actually felt bad about what he had done. I wonder how bad he really felt though. You could not get me to drive around in a truck with a dead woman in the back for very long. I would go into severe panic pretty fast, would stop the truck, get out and start walking or probably running away. I would not be able to walk around with a woman’s breast in my shirt for long either. I would completely panic almost right away, take the shirt off, throw it on the ground and start running. But then I am a pretty guilty type person with a strong conscience.

Based on that, while I am sure he may have felt some guilt for his killings, the fact that he was able to drive around in a truck with a dead woman in the  back for 3-4 days shows without completely flipping out shows to me that he didn’t feel that much guilt, certainly not on the level that most of us would. And the fact that he could rather calmly walk into a police station with a cut off breast in his pocket without flying into total panic shows to me that he didn’t feel that bad about it. So guilt, even when it is present, is not as strong as in most of us, otherwise they would not have even done such horrible things in the first place.

Sexual sadism is also often present, and I have heard that Sadistic Personality Disorder is very common. Juvenile delinquency, voyeurism, exhibitionism, burglary, prowling, petty thievery, etc. typically precede the serial killings. When the serial killer starts killing, he usually has a fairly long rap sheet of more minor offenses. The murders are best seen as an escalation of a chronic criminal character type.

The ones who kill children are typically though not always preferential or fixated pedophiles. Certainly the ones who kill only children are preferential pedophiles. There is a type of pedophile called a mysoped, which is a sadistic pedophile. They are not very common. I doubt if 5% of pedophiles are like this, but these people are very dangerous. Probably almost all serial child killers are mysopeds and these crimes often have a sexual basis.

95% of rapists are the type that rarely if ever go serial, but the sadistic rapist, composed of no more than 5% of rapists, is very dangerous. Most if not all rapist serial killers are sadistic rapists.

The rage rapist is dangerous, but he generally does not intend to kill his victim although he assault her. If she fights back or gets difficult, he can fly into a rage and beat her so badly that she dies but again he usually does not intend to kill. I doubt if these types go serial much if at all. Serial killers intend to kill; rage rapists do not.

Malignant narcissism, the disorder, believe it or not, of our wonderful President, is also present sometimes. Ted Bundy was a malignant narcissist. Yes, our wonderful President has the same mental illness as Ted Bundy! Comforting thought.

A few have Schizoid Personality Disorder, and some of the more disturbed ones have Borderline Personality Disorder.

Schizotypal, Paranoid and Narcissistic Personality Disorders are rare if ever seen in serial killers. Schizotypals are probably too disorganized and decompensated and just out and out strange to commit such crimes. The serial killer must blend in, and schizotypals do not do that. A few schizotypals have committed mass murders. James Holmes the Aurora Batman Theater Shooter, was a notable case. But note that he was caught immediately.

Paranoid PD is rarely if ever seen. These people tend to be rather retiring and like to hide away from a hostile world. They also do not like to call attention to themselves from a hostile world. They are suspicious and distrustful by nature and this makes it hard for them to blend in well with ordinary society as serial killers often do.

Narcissists are usually too self-centered to kill. While narcissists are often very mean, the disorder is usually well-controlled in that the rage rarely escalates to homicide. There have been a few cases of NPD’s committing mass murder, usually of their families.

The case of Jeffrey MacDonald, the mass murdering physician of Fatal Vision, seems to be such a case. This is a superb true crime case by the way.

Also narcissists think that if they kill, they will get caught, and if they are in prison or jail they will not be able to live this wonderful life they are supposed to be killing. They are “too cool to kill.” Killing would mess up all their wonderful plans to exploit others and hold them up to contempt by millions of people, which the narcissist would have a hard time taking. The narcissist is “too good for prison.” Prison would be such a crushing blow to their self-image that it would very hard to take.

However, malignant narcissists can be very dangerous because this is a combination of psychopathy, sadism, Paranoid PD and Narcissistic PD. When you weaponize NPD with paranoia, sadism and particularly psychopathy, you create a dangerous illness.

Cluster C Personality Disorders like Passive-Aggressive Personality Disorder, Self-Defeating Personality Disorder, Dependent Personality Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder are rarely if ever present in these types. These are PD’s where aggression is mostly displayed passively, and serial killers display aggression actively, not passively.

Mood disorders do not seem to be common. Bipolar Disorder is not common, and serial killers are rarely if ever depressed. They displace guilt and loathing outwards instead of pushing it inside of themselves as depressives do. Depressives are passive, and depression acts as sort of a freezing agent in that it tends to immobilize people by its nature. Men in general tend to either experience less depression than women or mask it with other things such as anger and rage, drinking, drugs, gambling, promiscuity or even workaholism. It is simply not acceptable as a man to be depressed, so depressed men simply channel their depression into other things and say they are not depressed, they are just drunks or workaholics, for instance.

Substance and alcohol abuse issues are quite common with serial killers, but the better ones are more sober, as drinkers and dopers tend to be scattered and unreliable and serial killers must be on the ball  24-7.

Only a few are psychotic. 2% of serial killers are psychotic. Psychotic people can barely organize a trip to the bathroom. How are they going to plot out elaborate and professional serial homicides?

They are motivated by many things, but your typical rape-murders of murders of attractive young women almost always have a sexual component. I would call these serial killings lust murders. The Germans coined the term. Even among the lust-murders, there are a number of different types. Some are motivated by purely sexual desires, others get off specifically on killing and the power gained from it, others are hunter types who get pleasure from the hunt and chase as if they were hunting an animal, which they are of course, but when we refer to hunters, we are always talking about hunters of non-human animals.

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Filed under Alcohol, Antisocial, Borderline, Crime, Criminology, Depressants, Depression, Intoxicants, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, Narcissism, Narcissistic, Pedophilia, Personality, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizotypal, Serial Killers, Sex, Sociology, Sociopathy

America: We’re Number One!

Time to rejoice, patriotards! America is Number One again, like it always is!

Donald Trump came in first place, beating out all contenders, for the stupidest President in US history. Yep, he really is a dummy. He’s so dumb, he can’t even read! Trump is so dumb, they asked him to spell dumb and he said, “Dum!” America! We’re Number One!

I guess the question is, “Is Trump nuts or is he dumb?” It’s a good question. He’s obviously nuts. He has a severe personality disorder. In fact, Donald Trump is a diagnosed psychopath. He fits in perfectly with his psychopathic political party and it’s sociopathic voters. America! We’re Number One! Number One is sociopathy! So not only is he nuts, but he’s also evil.

It’s really a trick question. He’s nuts and he’s evil and not only that, but he is severely fucktarded. The guy can’t even read. I mean c’mon man. Little children can do that. Little tiny children can actually read books, something the Presidunce of the United States can’t do. Little tiny children are smarter than the POTUS. Pitiful!

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Filed under Dangerous Idiots, Idiots, Mental Illness, Personality Disorders, Politics, Psychology, Psychopathology, Regional, Republicans, Sociopathy, US Politics, USA

Intelligence and Income Are Poorly Related, Part 4,860

Terrance: Do you know if the internet has any serious IQ tests? 2 years ago, wondering where I could know mine for sure, you told me that my university has a psychologist who does IQ testing. It turned out it doesn’t, or rather, they don’t want random guys passing the test because it takes 4 hours off their schedule and they’re busy.

But I do agree with those who say, that these tests are a waste of time if nobody, public or private sector, takes them into account. What a worker needs is obedience, not the quickest brains. What a careerist needs is ambition and social skills. What self-employed people need is discipline. If you aren’t any of that, it’s too bad, but I’d rather be one of the three than doing brain virtue signalling the rest of my life with other lonely gifted people.

This is sorry. I thought it was law that grade schools, high schools and universities have to give you a test if you ask for one. On the other hand, if you already got a score, they might not give you another one.

I would say to go to the Psychology Department and ask to be tested. There are quite a few Psychology professors there, and most are either Psychiatrists or Clinical  Psychologists I would imagine. I would think one of them might give you a test just for fun. Plus they sort of feel obligated.

You were absolutely tested in grade or high school. You had to be. It’s usually state law to give all students this test. You have access to your score from whichever school you took the test from. Ask your mother or father. They were definitely told your score.

An IQ test is a test of raw brain speed. This is why it is annoying that so many people insist that IQ tests do not measure intelligence. For Chrissake, what better measure of intelligence is there other than a test of how fast your brain works? Intelligence means the speed of your brain and not much else.

What is stupid about this is that idiots who say that IQ tests don’t mean anything are actually saying that it doesn’t matter how fast your brain works. Faster brains are no more intelligent than slower brains. Very slow brains may be the smartest of all and very fast brains are among the dumbest out there.

What sort of BS sense does that make? The speed of your brain does not matter in terms of job, career, income and so many other things? Most jobs don’t care how fast your brain works? Are you kidding me? That’s a pretty stupid thing to say!

Low IQ people have brains that do not work very fast when they work at all. Average IQ people have brains that work at the average speed for a human being in that country. High IQ people have brains that work fast. As you go up on the scales, you get brains that work faster and faster. Gifted people have brains that work faster than 98% of the population. Geniuses or genius IQ scorers are as common as dirt as there are 3.3 million geniuses. One out of every 100 Americans has a genius IQ. It’s not as impressive as you think. But these people have brains that actually work faster than 99% of the population.  Then you get to Cerebral Aliens who have brains that work faster than 99.9% of the population.

Problem is that when you to right around this point, IQ stops being adaptive and life outcomes in terms of job title, career and income start to decline. With every increased IQ point, these things decline more and more on a direct linear basis. Hence you have the smartest man on Earth, Christopher Langan, dropping out of university, and working at all sorts of working class jobs his whole life such as truck driver, lumberjack and bar bouncer. And you have the 160+ IQ men profiled earlier on this site who are actually so smart that their intelligence is actually a disability as opposed to a gift.

The reason is that as IQ climbs to 145 and above, people start getting weird and out there. With every IQ point rise,  they get stranger and stranger and often more and more introverted, socially awkward, lonely and celibate.

At some point, their IQ is so high that they are nearly nonfunctional and they can function only at a low level in society when they can function at all.

They are getting to the point where they are actually so damn smart that they are pretty much too smart to even function in society!

Sidis is said to be the smartest man who ever lived. He dropped out of university after dazzling professors and students alike at his school. He become very introverted, stayed inside most of the time, had few or no friends. was very lonely, never made a nickel and turned into an early trainspotter, as he become  utterly obsessed with bus schedules, making a vast collection of them and writing up many reports with graphs and figures about the various bus schedules.

The commenter is correct. And many high IQ and very high IQ people lack ambition, discipline, social skills and obedience or any combination of the above.

This is probably the reason you have so many high IQ people who are living at or near the poverty level. I could give you the names of five people right now who have IQ’s of 140-150.

One is an older woman, but she spent her whole life as a housewife. She did work a bit at the end, but she never made much money. I think the best job she had was paralegal and she was actually fired from that job I believe, the only job she was ever fired from. Office politics was the reason.

Three others are in their 50’s with IQ’s ranging from 140-147.

One never made more than $20,000 in their life. They have a variety of degrees – four the last I checked. Like the person below, they have a Masters Degree. This person works very little due to illness and lives off their savings. Prior to becoming ill, they worked or were in school the whole time. They had some decent jobs for a while there, but they really only worked full-time for 10-15 years. The rest of the time, they were in school.

The other worked at working class jobs their whole life and only obtained a university degree very late in life. They now have a BA and an MA. Sadly, very soon after they got that degree, they developed a very bad injury and were disabled. This person is presently collecting Disability, but they worked or were in school most of their life and they are in their 50’s. They never made any real money though.

The other made money at one time, but he is very mentally ill. He has Bipolar Disorder since age 21 or so, and as a result, he is manic most of the time. The drugs do not control his illness well and he is always symptomatic. His mania has been of the psychotic type very early on and if you did not know better, you would think he had schizophrenia. That is because he has delusions that are very schizophrenic-like. For instance, he gets messages from the TV. The weatherman might say, “It is going to rain tomorrow,” and that is actually a secret message telling him to go the store and buy a pack of cigarettes. Which he must do and promptly does.

He has been hospitalized over and over. I recently took a trip with him and it was a nightmare. It’s a good thing the trip ended when it did because if it went on much longer, I would have had to kill the guy. And like many schizophrenics, he never completely abandons his delusions. He still believes that the Objectivists are out to get him and they chase him on the road sometimes. He still believes that he is in fact Jesus Christ. In 1980, the DSM changed and a lot of people who had been called schizophrenic were thrown over to mood disorder, mostly to Bipolar Disorder and Major Depression.

Another was afflicted with Major Depression at a very early age of around 19 or so. They were pulled out of university, but later they went back and got a BA. They soon got on Disability after long being afflicted with Major Depression. They have had the diagnosis ever since and have never worked a real job except for one minor job as a s teenager. They did come out of the illness once when put on a certain drug. The illness lifted and they were able to get a good job at the Welfare Department of a large city. They soon got in trouble at the job and were fired after four months. This of course spun them back into a serious depression that they have been in ever since. Except for four months out of their life, this person has never made any money at all.

All five of these people are very smart, but most of them have hardly made a nickel in their lives. But note that four of them have some sort of injury or illness preventing them from doing much work, and three actually collect Disability. Surely physical and  mental handicaps can seriously get in the way of achievement for very high IQ people. It certainly stands to reason.

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Filed under Depression, Education, Intelligence, Labor, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, Personality, Psychology, Psychopathology

Is It True That Sexually Sadistic Serial Killers Rarely Have Partners?

Paula: TWO killers is odd….two sadistic people who commit crimes together is very very unusual….I’m leaning towards one person with a grudge and one person tagging along, IF there were indeed two people….

This is a very common belief and you hear this all the time. Particularly women seem to believe that these fellows usually act alone. I suppose women in particular find it impossible to understand how two men could find each other and plot a series of the worst crimes of all. Men find it hard too. I mean I have had some bad friends who stole, shot drugs, you name it. They had done a few stints in jail. I’ve had some really bizarre conversations with my friends. You name it, we discussed it. But never in my life have I had a friend say, “Hey Bob, let’s go out rape, torture and murder some women. What do you say?” I cannot fathom a conversation like that between two men. Where on Earth do they find each other?

But actually these men acting with partner(s) is quite common. Sexual sadists often have partners in crime. Usually another man or even men, but sometimes a woman – a wife or girlfriend. The woman comes under the influence of the man, and that is why she helps him to commit these crimes. She usually is not bad per se. In other words, if she had not hooked up with that bad boyfriend or husband, she would probably never have done such a thing.

I believe Freeway Killer William Bonin had maybe six accomplices. Dean Corll had many accomplices too. One of the Santa Rosa Hitchhiker Murders is thought to involve three men. The Smiley Face Murders, bizarre drownings of up to 90 young college men in the middle of the US, if these are even real crimes at all, are thought to involve a number of people, maybe up to 3-4 men, operating out of a van.

The Hillside Stranglers, the Sunset Strip Murders, Bittaker and Norris, it goes on and on. It is suspected that Randy Kraft‘s roommate, a deep S/M freak, helped him to commit some of the murders.

The latter four are right here in southern California, and they were all operating in a short period of time in the late 1970’s.

The Operation Miranda killers, Charles Ng and Leonard Lake, Otis Toole and Henry Lee Lucas, the list goes on and on.

Ken and Barbie Killers Paul Bernardi and Karla Homulka and Sunset Strip Killers Doug Clark and Carol Bundy are two cases where the female partners of the men participated in the crimes. In both cases, the women willingly went along with the crimes and even helped participate in them. After a while, they came to enjoy committing these crimes and even got into the sexual aspect of them. Homulka and Bundy are both pretty sociopathic, but if those women never met those men, they never would have done anything like this.

In addition to the above, I can think of three other cases where men had partners, in two cases, two men as a team in one case and a man and a woman who came under his influence in the other. Problem is I cannot remember the names of the killings nor the participants.

And I think there are more cases than I have gone over above.

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Filed under California, Crime, Gender Studies, Mental Illness, Midwest, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Regional, Romantic Relationships, Serial Killers, Sex, Sociopathy, USA, West, Women