Category Archives: Psychotic Disorders

Paranoia, Aggression, Victimhood, and Assimilation: The Dilemma of the Jews

If you want to find out if someone is an anti-Semite, the last person you should ask is a Jew. This is because Jews see probably 10X more antisemites than actually exist. In other words, they’re paranoid.

One wonders why one would want to think that people who like you actually hate you or go about worrying all the time that many people in your day to day life surreptitiously hate you. If you go to a therapist with symptoms like that, you get diagnosed with a mental disorder. It’s called paranoia. When it gets very bad, it becomes Paranoid Personality Disorder and it gets even worse in a lot of psychoses, especially Paranoid Schizophrenia, Manic Psychosis, and Delusional Disorder.

If paranoia is a mental illness, does that mean that most Jews are nuts? Maybe. I’d much rather call Jews crazy than evil. Besides, it’s a lot more accurate.

But one wonders why the need for the paranoia? It’s simple. The Jews are a tribe, a human tribe. Judaism and Jewishness is simple a manifestation of human ethnocentrism found in every tribe. All tribes are paranoid about all the other tribes and have an extremely elevated view of themselves that implies that they are either the best people on Earth, the only people on Earth, or the first people on Earth. Paranoia tends to go hand in hand with grandiosity. After all, if you are a measly nothing of a man, why would all of these powerful entities be plotting against you all the time. The only way you could have all these people out to get you is if you were pretty damned important!

People with low self-esteem are not usually paranoid. They assume people don’t like them, often correctly. At any rate “people don’t like me” is an anxiety process related to low self-self esteem, anxiety, guilt and high inhibition. The classic process is Social Phobia. Social phobics often feel that people don’t like them because they are inferior. But that’s not paranoia!

Paranoids, instead, go far beyond the notion that people don’t like them. It’s so much worse than that. Paranoids believe that the people who don’t like you are actual enemies and they are plotting against you! And it’s associated with high self-esteem, not low self-esteem, and low levels of anxiety as opposed to high levels. Instead of anxiety and depression, the paranoid feels grandiosity and anger.

Now here we tie into the Jews.

Look a the description I just wrote of how paranoids act and feel and tell me that doesn’t sound exactly like some of the negative stereotypes of Jews.

Why be paranoid?

The Jews are paranoid because paranoia is the only thing that keeps them going. In the Middle Ages, they actually built some of those ghettos themselves in order to keep their people away from the Gentiles. In 1800, a proper Orthodox Jew would not only not dine with a Gentile. He would not even take tea with one! The Yemeni Jews are like this to this very day.

For centuries in the ghetto, the rabbis preached how the Gentiles hated them and how the Jews had to keep away from the Gentiles. In Medieval Spain, if a Jewish woman had sex with a Gentile, her community would punish her by cutting off her nose!

The Jews are remarkably inbred. They have existed for 2,000 years in the Diaspora and they are still remarkably pure. A good way to keep your tribe pure is to preach that all of the outsiders are evil people who hate you. Of course you don’t want to mingle with them, much less have sex with them.

So the Jews actually owe their very existence to centuries of paranoia along with all the attendant emotions that go along with it – grandiosity towards themselves, anger and hostility (not anxiety) towards non- Jews and basically aggressive, belligerent, chip on the shoulder mindset, which clinical paranoids also have.

All paranoids are victims. Not only that, but they are innocent victims. Innocent victimhood is a necessary state for the paranoia to develop in the first place. The Jews also are perennial victims. They are supposedly victims of centuries of oppression everywhere they  have gone and the future only holds the same if not worse. And of course the Jews are always innocent. They got thrown out of all those countries through no fault of their own. They dindu nuffin. Those Gentiles were just being irrational or insane and downright evil. Pure evil. Pure evil for no reason at all, the worst sort of evil of them all.

Hence it follows that Jews have a need to be victims. Hang around Jews long enough and it will become apparent that they actually desire and cherish their victimhood. In fact, in my opinion, victimhood is the most precious thing a Jew has. One thing you don’t do is take away a Jews sense of victimhood. It seems they will almost kill to keep that.

So what happens if you take away the paranoia and sense of victimhood from the Jews? Simple. The Jews go extinct. The only reason they persisted all this time was due to their hatred for non-Jews. The day the Jews stop hating non-Jews and seeing themselves as victims of all-encompassing anti-Semitism is the day the Jews start going out. Because once that happens, the Jews will have no reason not to assimilate and marry non-Jews.

And this is the Catch-22 of Jewish assimilation. And in fact some of these very arguments have been used by Jews themselves in the centuries-old debate about assimilation.

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Filed under Anti-Semitism, Culture, Jews, Mental Illness, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Race/Ethnicity, Racism, The Jewish Question

Are Schizophrenic People Smart?

Although of course schizophrenics vary in IQ, the research shows that lower IQ is associated with schizophrenia. Typically the lower IQ was present before the schizophrenia hit. Whether these people already had pre-schizophrenia and the low IQ was a signal of that or whether lower IQ is an independent risk factor is not known. I suggest the former.

I am not sure if schizophrenia itself, once it hits, causes an IQ decline, but it would not surprise me. The process of developing schizophrenia involves considerable damage to the brain. It makes sense that this brain damage, in addition to causing the disorder, also lowered your IQ.

In summary, people with schizophrenia tend to have lower IQ’s than normals on average, but the difference may not be large. I think it was only ~3 points.

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How Can I Tell If I Have Paranoid Schizophrenia or Schizotypal Personality Disorder?

Answered on Quora.

Simple. If you had either one, you would probably not be asking this question right now.

If you had paranoid schizophrenia, you would not be asking this question because people with this illness do not recognize that they are ill, typically refuse to seek help, and also refuse to take medication. If you tell them they are ill, they will not agree.

If you had Schizotypal Personality Disorder (really mild schizophrenia) you would probably not be asking this either. These people probably do not believe there is anything wrong with themselves either, and they are typically too paranoid to go in for treatment. There is a forum for Schizotypals on the Net, and many of them are on there saying that they are too paranoid and distrustful to go to therapy.

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Borderlands: Obsession, Delusion and Their Differential Diagnosis

The Borderland between Obsession and Delusion

Anxiety processes can at times escalate all the way to psychosis. I have had some OCD clients who I had a very hard time figuring out if they were psychotic or not. With one, I told a retired therapist of their symptoms, and the therapist immediately said, “Well, they’re psychotic. That’s a delusion.” The things that they believed or almost believed did look like psychotic delusions. However, they did not entirely believe them. OCD with Overvalued Ideas was probably a better diagnosis. There are a few cases of Psychotic OCD. I have never seen one though, although this case was getting close.

When OCD gets very bad, they appear psychotic. However, they generally are not, and in 95% of cases, I can figure out that they are not psychotic. That is because Severe OCD That Looks Psychotic has this particular look, feel, or vibe (gestalt) about it where the cases all give off this particular vibe. It’s like they are all reading off the same script in a sense.

The Problem of Psychotic People Hiding Symptoms

You get a different look, feel, or vibe (gestalt) with an actively psychotic individual, but they can be hard to figure out too because sometimes they lie about their delusions.

I have caught them hiding symptoms from me.

Some people with psychoses learn to hide symptoms because they figure out that every time they say “The FBI is after me,” someone grabs them and hauls them off to the hospital. So they continue to believe the FBI is after them, but they learn to shut up about it.

You look at what the person is doing in reaction to the thoughts. They thought the neighbors were hacking into their computer so they disconnected their computer from the Internet? Delusion. A person who just had the fear or obsession that the neighbors were hacking in would not disconnect the computer, and their description of the fear would be full of all of these strange doubts and uncertainties.

The Difficulty of Differentiating between Thoughts and Voices

Psychotic people sometimes refer to thoughts as voices. I had one client who referred to thoughts telling him to do bad things, in this case, to kill animals. He had recently killed five puppies in response to these thoughts ordering him to kill these animals. I suspected these were more than thoughts, so I had him describe them, and he said, “It’s a thought, you know. You hear it like someone standing next to you and talking.” Ok if you hear it outside your body like that, it’s not a thought, it’s a voice.

Some people with schizophrenia hear their thoughts spoken out loud in the environment, and they fear or believe that others can hear their thoughts being broadcast out there. However, if you corner them on it, some will try to deny it by saying that they just have very loud thoughts in their heads, and the thoughts are so loud that they worry or fear that maybe others can hear them. That’s not quite precisely a delusion, and it’s not a hallucination like the thought broadcasting. It’s off into the obsession/delusion borderland.

Schiz OCD – OCD with the Fear of Psychosis Theme

There is a type of OCD where the person fears that they are going psychotic. OCD’ers have made up a term called Schiz OCD for this illness, which is really OCD with the Fear of Psychosis as the theme. Some clinicians have complained to me about these “hokey names” for the different OCD types and accused me of making them up. I didn’t make up any of them.

The sufferers make up these names for the different themes that they have. I feel that the sufferers have a right to own their symptoms and illnesses and call them whatever they want to call them. That’s their right as sufferers.

Who are we to tell them that their name for their symptoms is the wrong name? Do we have a better name? Of course not. “We” are just arrogant clinicians who think we know these illnesses better than the sufferers themselves know them. I realize Schiz OCD is a confusing name, but it’s the name they picked, and we don’t have a better one, so let’s go with it.

They develop all sorts of “psychotic” symptoms, including fake delusions, fake hallucinations, and even perceptual disturbances. Once again the Schiz OCD symptoms have a completely different quality – look, feel, vibe or gestalt – than you get with someone who has actual delusions and real hallucinations. In addition, all of the Schiz OCD symptoms have a very similar quality across many different people – once again, it’s like they are all reading off the same script.

The Problem of Misdiagnosis in Schiz OCD

I have now seen more people like this than I can count, and I’m an expert on this illness. But I still get people with this type of OCD coming to me all the time with diagnoses of various types of psychoses, schizophrenia, psychotic depression, etc. They received these diagnoses from qualified clinicians such as psychiatrists and clinical psychologists. They were misdiagnosed in 95% of cases, so you see even skilled clinicians can’t tell this OCD type from a psychosis in a lot of cases.

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Filed under Anxiety Disorders, Mental Illness, OCD, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotherapy, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia, Symptoms

Are People on the Schizophrenic Spectrum Less Intelligent?

Answered on Quora: 

Indeed, repeated studies have shown that schizophrenia is associated with a somewhat lower IQ – possibly 5–10 points. These studies showed that schizophrenics had lower IQ even before the schizophrenia developed.

Why schizophrenia is associated with lower IQ is not known, but schizophrenia is a disease of the brain, and it seems that whatever is causing the schizophrenia is also lowering the IQ.

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Schizophrenia and Autism: Similarities and Differences

JohnnyHG writes: There is evidence schizophrenia is developmental like Autism. I would exclude the cases of diagnosis of someone with a history of drug use or brief psychotic hallucinations from environment. The fuck up just gets delayed – it’s latent, which is why it happens in one’s teens/early 20s rather than toddlerhood. But there are signs lasting years leading up to it if I am correct, prodromal? It doesn’t happen overnight.

Experts have watched videos of children who later went on to develop the condition and could pick them out after a while. Often poorer school grades, abnormal movements, and irritable behavior could be found. Plus the negative and cognitive symptoms overlap heavily with Asperger’s/ASD or just Autism Disorder. I believe they bundled it all up because there is too much heterogeneity, hence the distinction between AS and Autism was a bit artificial.

Some things seem to be opposites: clumsiness in autism vs. stupor/stiffness in SCZ, repetitive literal speech or no speech in autism vs alogia or garbled speech in SCZ, obsessiveness with one topic in autism vs apathy in SCZ, but stereotypies are shared and so are bizarre habits. However, there is a different flavor to them, hard to describe.

Do you believe it is neurodevelopmental or stick with the old belief it’s degenerative?

Thanks for the excellent comment. I share your views. I have long believed that schizophrenia is developmental. Really they are born with it or born with the tendency. With enough stress or genetic loading, they get schizophrenia, and if they have little stress or low genetic loading, they either get schizotypal personality disorder (really just mild schizophrenia) or they may get schizophrenia with a later onset.

There really are two things they are seeing in the early symptoms.

The first are the early symptoms – clumsiness, oddness, poor grades, irritability, etc. Those are childhood symptoms.

Then there is the prodrome which hits in adolescence at some point. This causes a slow deterioration over a few years’ period leading to the classic onset from 16-24. I was best friends with a man with paranoid schizophrenia for a year. I hung out with him every day that year. It was a most interesting experience!

At the time, he was 27 years old and he was in the prodromal phase of paranoid schizophrenia. It had been going on maybe since age ~22, so five years. A long slow prodrome is common in paranoid schizophrenia. He was hearing voices the whole time, but his charming personality was quite intact. He was half-Black, very good-looking, and very charming, and he attracted White women everywhere we went together. He later got slowly worse and worse, and after a while, he was not even talking much. I haven’t heard much about him since, as my relatives are telling me to avoid him.

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Filed under Asperger's Syndrome, Autism, Mental Illness, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia, Schizotypal

A Few Words About Schizophrenia and Psychosis in General

I do not know much about schizophrenia. I have met two people who were schizophrenic who discussed their symptoms with me.

The young man was medicated but he was still too ill to work and lived off disability. The woman may also have been medicated and she also lived off disability. This is a typical outcome for this illness, sadly.

Her diagnosis was a true grab bag, and she had been diagnosed with everything in the book, including OCD and frequently Borderline Personality Disorder. I was not sure what her complete picture was, but in adolescence and early adulthood, she underwent what looked like a classic schizophrenic prodrome process. There’s nothing else that looks like that. Afterwards a lot of psychotic symptoms developed including visual hallucinations. Also she did not believe she was ill, which is typical of these folks.

I could not really see the Borderline PD. The problem with these schizophrenics is that the schizophrenic process is so complete and totalizing that it essentially swamps over all sorts of other or lesser symptoms.

 

 

The man also had an OCD process going on, and he denied his symptoms were caused by mental illness. He was also trying to hide symptoms from me, which they do sometimes after the illness goes on for a while. It’s not that they believe the symptoms are crazy – they think it is actually true that the man in the TV said, “It’s going to rain today” and that really is a secret message to them telling them to go to the store and buy a pack of cigarettes. Incidentally that is a common type of psychotic symptom and they are called delusions of reference and they are common in schizophrenia. I have someone close to me who had Bipolar 1 Disorder with prominent psychotic (schizophrenic-like) features who had symptoms exactly like that.

The thing is that even chronic psychotics are not stupid and are driven by the pleasure principle to avoid pain. Eventually these people often figure out that when they say certain things like that the CIA is after them, people tend to get alarmed, call the police and they get hospitalized. Being more rational than you would think, they learn to keep some of these symptoms to themselves if only to stay out of the hospital.

He had a lot more insight than a typical schizophrenic which may be due to the OCD, which would introduce a chronic doubting nature into the psychosis, which would be good for any psychosis, as they are based on hard belief. There are new theories about an illness called Schizo-obsessive Disorder which looked a lot like what this man had. Paranoia, Shneiderian symptoms, and a better prognosis are among the features. To give you an example of the Shneiderian features, for instance, this man heard his own thoughts spoken out loud in the exact same way as if you were to speak your thoughts out loud – how creepy! He was afraid to ride the buses as he feared that the others on the bus could hear his thoughts as he thought them as they sounded as loud and clear as if there were someone talking right next to you.

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Filed under Anxiety Disorders, Borderline, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, OCD, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia

Psychosis Is Bad for Your Brain

The problem of psychosis is not only the devastating social and societal effects it has on individuals and their effects on society. New research suggests that going psychotic is bad for your body itself.

These active psychotic processes seem to cause actual damage to the brain – consequently the negative symptoms seen later which may be a manifestation of that. In acute psychosis, you often get excess dopamine flooding out of dopamine neurons – in fact, L-Dopa, a dopamine drug given to Parkinson’s Disease characterized by dying dopamine neurons has the side effect of acute psychosis. It is thought that the excess dopamine flooding out of these neurons may damage these neurons or the connections.

Damaged dopamine neurons could cause the flattened affect, boredom and “staring at  your shoe for 10 hours” negative symptoms that occur later in the illness as some of these same symptoms are characteristic of Parkinson’s. Any major flooding you get out of neurons might damage the neuron. MDMA causes massive outflows of serotonin and it definitely damages serotonin neurons or more precisely the connections between them. The connections are damaged and become shorter and frayed. They do grow back but they typically don’t grow back to their full length and breadth. You get massive outflows of dopamine with methamphetamine also, and increasing evidence shows that this drug can also damage the brain, once again more the connections (dendrites) rather than the cells themselves.

You hear over and over how drugs kill brain cells but they don’t usually do that. It is more common that they damage the connections or they make it so a certain receptor on a particular type of cell does not work quite as well. Your brain cells are dying off all the time anyway, as they peak at age 23 and then drop off every year until death (this is why musical and mathematics prodigies peak very early in life – music and math benefit by high fluid intelligence or sheer brain speed.

Bottom line is being psychotic is bad for your brain. That’s as good a reason as any to get a handle on any active psychotic process.

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Filed under Amphetamine Psychedelics, Hallucinogens, Health, Illness, Intelligence, Intoxicants, MDMA, Mental Illness, Neuroscience, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Science, Social Problems, Sociology, Speed, Stimulants

Schizophrenia “Swamps out” Any Other Disorders in the Individual

The problem with schizophrenics is that the schizophrenic process is so complete and totalizing that it essentially swamps over all sorts of other or lesser symptoms.

All you see is the schizophrenia, and its hard to see if there are anxiety, mood (Axis 1 or symptomatic) or especially personality disorders (Axis 2) underneath there. It’s like there’s a tidal wave coming in (the schizophrenia), and you are running around your house looking for roaches (other disorders).  Well, the wave is going to swamp all those roaches, and even if they are there, at some point all you will see is the wave, and the only thing that will matter is the wave, as the roaches will be swamped out so to speak.

Also schizophrenia itself can feature prominent anxiety at times (for instance that the FBI is after them), although anxiety is not typical a primary feature of schizophrenia.

Schizophrenics are often depressed, but it seems like depression is part of the schizophrenia itself. Obviously when depression is part of core schizophrenia as a symptom, it makes it hard to tell that apart from a depression arising often from the depressing effects of the illness itself.

Axis 2 (personality disorder) problems are going to get swamped out too, not to mention the fact that having schizophrenia alone has a devastating effect on personality.

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Filed under Depression, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia

Differential Diagnosis in Psychiatry – Separating “Symptomatic” Processes from “Core” Processes

In an anxiety disorder, the main thing you see or the “meat” of the illness is the anxiety – I call it an “anxiety process.” In this sense, even some anxiety disorders that have gone psychotic, say Psychotic OCD or Body Dysmorphic Disorder, are still basically anxiety disorders at their core and not psychotic disorders.

The primary disturbance or process if you will is anxiety and the psychosis is just growing out of that process.

What we are doing here is looking for the core essence of the problem – the Gestalt if you will. We are ignoring symptomatic features on the outside and looking underneath them to see what the core or basic process is underneath.

In the same sense, mood disorders that have gone psychotic or even resemble schizophrenia are better seen as mood processes. In Bipolar Disorder, the primary disturbance is one of mood. The psychotic features, if any, are only present during the mood disturbance – the depression or mania. The psychotic features are flowing out of the mood issue and not the other way around as in the case of some schizophrenic persons who get depressed due to the depressing nature of their illness.

If you clear up the mood process and the psychosis is still there, it tends to go over to Schizoaffective Disorder. This is a controversial category, but it is valid. No one quite knows what it is, but I believe the best explanation is that this is simply Schizophrenia and a mood disorder – Major Depression or Bipolar Disorder – occurring in the same person. Persons with Schizoaffective Disorder tend to be heavily loaded genetically for both mood disorders and schizophrenia, whereas someone with a core mood disorder will tend to have mood disorders in their family history and someone with schizophrenia will tend to have relatives with schizophrenia.

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Filed under Anxiety Disorders, Depression, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, OCD, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia