Category Archives: Personality Disorders

Schizophrenia and Autism: Similarities and Differences

JohnnyHG writes: There is evidence schizophrenia is developmental like Autism. I would exclude the cases of diagnosis of someone with a history of drug use or brief psychotic hallucinations from environment. The fuck up just gets delayed – it’s latent, which is why it happens in one’s teens/early 20s rather than toddlerhood. But there are signs lasting years leading up to it if I am correct, prodromal? It doesn’t happen overnight.

Experts have watched videos of children who later went on to develop the condition and could pick them out after a while. Often poorer school grades, abnormal movements, and irritable behavior could be found. Plus the negative and cognitive symptoms overlap heavily with Asperger’s/ASD or just Autism Disorder. I believe they bundled it all up because there is too much heterogeneity, hence the distinction between AS and Autism was a bit artificial.

Some things seem to be opposites: clumsiness in autism vs. stupor/stiffness in SCZ, repetitive literal speech or no speech in autism vs alogia or garbled speech in SCZ, obsessiveness with one topic in autism vs apathy in SCZ, but stereotypies are shared and so are bizarre habits. However, there is a different flavor to them, hard to describe.

Do you believe it is neurodevelopmental or stick with the old belief it’s degenerative?

Thanks for the excellent comment. I share your views. I have long believed that schizophrenia is developmental. Really they are born with it or born with the tendency. With enough stress or genetic loading, they get schizophrenia, and if they have little stress or low genetic loading, they either get schizotypal personality disorder (really just mild schizophrenia) or they may get schizophrenia with a later onset.

There really are two things they are seeing in the early symptoms.

The first are the early symptoms – clumsiness, oddness, poor grades, irritability, etc. Those are childhood symptoms.

Then there is the prodrome which hits in adolescence at some point. This causes a slow deterioration over a few years’ period leading to the classic onset from 16-24. I was best friends with a man with paranoid schizophrenia for a year. I hung out with him every day that year. It was a most interesting experience!

At the time, he was 27 years old and he was in the prodromal phase of paranoid schizophrenia. It had been going on maybe since age ~22, so five years. A long slow prodrome is common in paranoid schizophrenia. He was hearing voices the whole time, but his charming personality was quite intact. He was half-Black, very good-looking, and very charming, and he attracted White women everywhere we went together. He later got slowly worse and worse, and after a while, he was not even talking much. I haven’t heard much about him since, as my relatives are telling me to avoid him.

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Filed under Asperger's Syndrome, Autism, Mental Illness, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia, Schizotypal

The More I Learn about True Psychopaths, the More I Despise Them. Do You Think They Deserve any Compassion?

Answered on Quora.

I don’t think that psychopaths are deserving of much in the way of compassion personally.

Keep in mind that Quora is swarming with psychopaths and their supporters (I call them lieutenants or hangers-on) who are here to try to make it look like psychopaths are really nice people. This is part of the mask. Psychopaths need to adjust their image (hence the mask) so they can participate in society and mostly so they can access more of us to victimize, which is what they do. Why do psychopaths wear their masks. In my opinion, they have to wear their masks because this is the only way the rest of us will allow them to participate in society at all. What would happen if all psychopaths threw away their masks and showed us their true colors? The non-psychopaths would simply rise up and kill all of the psychopaths. And most would be acquitted too I suspect. This is actually the typical fate of psychopaths in more primitive societies.

You can feel any way you want to about psychopaths. If you want to like them, you can. If you want to hate them, it’s surely understandable. If you want to like some and not others, it makes sense.

At the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter. Do you know any psychopaths? If you don’t, what difference does it make how you feel about them? If you have a psychopath near your life, you can decide whether to like them or not. I would advise wariness and mostly just getting away from them.

I have known a few people with psychopathic traits in my life. I have known others who become psychopathic in the midst of other illnesses like manic episodes. Although there were good times mixed among the bad (often true with these charmers), the end result was that they hurt and damaged me badly. My opinion is that if you are involved with these people for any length of time, you are going to get harmed or damaged. This is because psychopaths harm or damage others as a basic matter of livingthis is simply what they do, how they function on a day to day basis.

Even borderline psychopaths could care less if they hurt you or not, and they may well do just that. Why wouldn’t they? If they could care less if they hurt you or not, what would stop them from doing it? These people could quit acting this way anytime they want to. They know what they are doing. They don’t want to get better. They don’t want to stop being psychopaths. They like being psychopaths. They don’t want to care about whether they hurt others or not.

If you can dredge up some psychopath out there who you think is prosocial enough to be friends with you or me, by all means show him to me.

Look, psychopaths are just not good people. Being a bad boy is one thing, but psychopaths are bad men, and that is worse than being a bad boy. A lot of bad boys are just rebels, and most of the rest are just trying to get laid. They aren’t really bad people.  There are good people, there are bad people, and there are a lot of mixed bags. Psychopaths really are bad people.

A lot of people are pretty lousy human beings themselves, they like the idea of being bad, and they probably like psychopaths for being bad. You sound like you are a good person or are trying to be one. Why should a good person like psychopaths? There’s no reason. If any people on this Earth deserve to be disliked, it is psychopaths.

Don’t feel guilty about hating psychopaths, and don’t feel bad for them. These charmers are very slick, and they will always find new victims lift off their feet and fleece. The psychopath is a survivor. Sadly, many of their victims are not.

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A Few Words About Schizophrenia and Psychosis in General

I do not know much about schizophrenia. I have met two people who were schizophrenic who discussed their symptoms with me.

The young man was medicated but he was still too ill to work and lived off disability. The woman may also have been medicated and she also lived off disability. This is a typical outcome for this illness, sadly.

Her diagnosis was a true grab bag, and she had been diagnosed with everything in the book, including OCD and frequently Borderline Personality Disorder. I was not sure what her complete picture was, but in adolescence and early adulthood, she underwent what looked like a classic schizophrenic prodrome process. There’s nothing else that looks like that. Afterwards a lot of psychotic symptoms developed including visual hallucinations. Also she did not believe she was ill, which is typical of these folks.

I could not really see the Borderline PD. The problem with these schizophrenics is that the schizophrenic process is so complete and totalizing that it essentially swamps over all sorts of other or lesser symptoms.

 

 

The man also had an OCD process going on, and he denied his symptoms were caused by mental illness. He was also trying to hide symptoms from me, which they do sometimes after the illness goes on for a while. It’s not that they believe the symptoms are crazy – they think it is actually true that the man in the TV said, “It’s going to rain today” and that really is a secret message to them telling them to go to the store and buy a pack of cigarettes. Incidentally that is a common type of psychotic symptom and they are called delusions of reference and they are common in schizophrenia. I have someone close to me who had Bipolar 1 Disorder with prominent psychotic (schizophrenic-like) features who had symptoms exactly like that.

The thing is that even chronic psychotics are not stupid and are driven by the pleasure principle to avoid pain. Eventually these people often figure out that when they say certain things like that the CIA is after them, people tend to get alarmed, call the police and they get hospitalized. Being more rational than you would think, they learn to keep some of these symptoms to themselves if only to stay out of the hospital.

He had a lot more insight than a typical schizophrenic which may be due to the OCD, which would introduce a chronic doubting nature into the psychosis, which would be good for any psychosis, as they are based on hard belief. There are new theories about an illness called Schizo-obsessive Disorder which looked a lot like what this man had. Paranoia, Shneiderian symptoms, and a better prognosis are among the features. To give you an example of the Shneiderian features, for instance, this man heard his own thoughts spoken out loud in the exact same way as if you were to speak your thoughts out loud – how creepy! He was afraid to ride the buses as he feared that the others on the bus could hear his thoughts as he thought them as they sounded as loud and clear as if there were someone talking right next to you.

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Filed under Anxiety Disorders, Borderline, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, OCD, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia “Swamps out” Any Other Disorders in the Individual

The problem with schizophrenics is that the schizophrenic process is so complete and totalizing that it essentially swamps over all sorts of other or lesser symptoms.

All you see is the schizophrenia, and its hard to see if there are anxiety, mood (Axis 1 or symptomatic) or especially personality disorders (Axis 2) underneath there. It’s like there’s a tidal wave coming in (the schizophrenia), and you are running around your house looking for roaches (other disorders).  Well, the wave is going to swamp all those roaches, and even if they are there, at some point all you will see is the wave, and the only thing that will matter is the wave, as the roaches will be swamped out so to speak.

Also schizophrenia itself can feature prominent anxiety at times (for instance that the FBI is after them), although anxiety is not typical a primary feature of schizophrenia.

Schizophrenics are often depressed, but it seems like depression is part of the schizophrenia itself. Obviously when depression is part of core schizophrenia as a symptom, it makes it hard to tell that apart from a depression arising often from the depressing effects of the illness itself.

Axis 2 (personality disorder) problems are going to get swamped out too, not to mention the fact that having schizophrenia alone has a devastating effect on personality.

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Filed under Depression, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia

Chronic Mental Illness and Personality

Axis 2 disorders (personality disorders) are hard to diagnose in schizophrenia because of the swamping nature of schizophrenia and because schizophrenia itself has a devastating effect on personality.

Even mood disorders often cause serious personality changes. When they hit in adolescence, maturity is often frozen at whatever the age the illness hit. This is why you see people with chronic mental illness in their mid-50’s who still act like teenagers. They act that way because the chronic illness hit in adolescence and their maturation process for all intents and purposes froze in place.

You really need to treat the mood disorder and then see if there is anything left on Axis 2.

I don’t believe in diagnosing personality disorders that are caused by an Axis 1 symptomatic process (anxiety or mood disorder) because this violates the basic theory of Axis 2 – that these are illnesses at the very core or essence of the person, at the soul itself if you will – that usually have roots deep in childhood and adolescence and are always apparent by adolescence or early adulthood. Pathological personality change in later life violates the principles of Axis 2, but maybe we need a new DSM category for that, as it does occur sometimes.

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Filed under Anxiety Disorders, Mental Illness, Mood Disorders, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia

Americans Love Winners and Hate Losers

Jason Y: Robert said a macho man won’t complain about personal stuff – that makes him a wuss. I appear to be doing that about Korea.

You are complaining about other people being assholes. No one will mind that.

I am saying you cannot complain about stuff that makes you seem weak or lame. You can complain about anything outside of that. In particular, women really, really hate it if you complain about anything that makes you seem weak or lame. Have you ever had pets? Notice that one cat is sort of weak and submissive and frightened? Well, what happens? All the other cats, seeing that weak, frightened, submissive cat, instinctively attack that cat. That sort of behavior brings out the desire to attack in most mammals and we are nothing if not mammals. I am more afraid of women thinking I am weak or lame than men. Women are far harsher on men than our fellow men are.

The cause of “toxic masculinity” is women!

If you say you are being bullied for being weak or you complain about anything that makes you seem weak, women just instinctively hate that in general. The nicer ones will be pleasant about it, especially if she loves you. But a lot of women (and men too) have this winners – losers mindset. If you got bullied for whatever reason by mean, evil fucks, a lot of women and men will both side with bullies and see this as an example of you being a failed pussy wuss. I have actually had this happen to me. I did not get bullied too much as a kid (some) but I did get bullied some as an adult believe it or not. It was just a couple or a few people each time.

People will side with evil people if they bully you for being weak, a wuss, a pussy, etc. A lot of people, men and women, think if you didn’t act so damn weak, wussy, pussy, etc. you would not get bullied. It is called Blame the Victim. America is a Blame the Victim Culture. That is one truly shitty thing about this country.

And if you are siding with evil bullies tormenting some poor schmuck for whatever reason, being a wuss or whatever, frankly you are thinking like a sociopath.

The bullies are the winners. The bullied are the losers.

Americans side with winners. Americans hate losers – this one is particularly true.

This is a winner take all society.

America is a sociopathic country in that sense.

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Filed under American, Culture, Gender Studies, Heterosexuality, Man World, Psychology, Psychopathology, Sex, Sociopathy

What Happens to a Narcissist When They Are Old, Washed up, Alone, and No One Wants Them?

Answered on Quora.

I do not believe that they ever get to that point. I have known several middle aged narcissists, and I have known a couple of narcissists who made it into old age. However, these two were “pleasant narcissists” who liked me.

One guy simply had no interest whatsoever in anything you said, and he talked about himself and bragged constantly. Incidentally bit about having no interest in your words is a stark warning sign that you are dealing with serious NPD. They ask you how you are doing, they listen for 30 seconds, and then they are looking around the room, bored. Or they rudely tell you to shut up. Or they are just obviously not interested.

This man was very wealthy, and he was rather senile when I knew him. I pointed out his narcissism to others, and others, blind to these folks as most are, said he was just senile. They never stop fooling people.

Narcissists are often goodlooking, charming, and have figured out ways of making decent money. They keep enough looks, charm and money around them through most of their lives that they tend to have people around them and even close to them even into middle or old age.

All narcissists I have known were married. One narcissist, when he was not married, was one of the most wildly successful PUA womanizers I have ever met. Whatever the faults of narcissists, social failure does not seem to be one of them.

I suppose I would like to meet a narcissist like you describe because I have never heard of one.

The closest I can think of was a serial killer who I believe was a malignant narcissist. Cannot recall his name now. He may have killed in Oregon and Washington. He was alone and maybe even on Death Row. A female journalist went to interview him and said even locked into his tiny cell, he was still “that guy,” prancing around in his cell like a model on a runway. He would always be “Joe Cool” even as he walked to the electric chair.

Ted Bundy seemed to think quite highly of himself in prison, and on trial for murder, he put on quite a show. He had a coterie of female admirers who never left him, and I think he married one. Bundy was a malignant narcissist. A number of serial killers had this diagnosis. Incidentally, our current president shares this diagnosis with these serial killers.

That charm never seems to turn off, and as long as it is on, the moths will come to the narcissist’s light. Even alone in their cells for serial murder, they still think they are Gods among men. It doesn’t seem to be possible to take these people down a peg. Their self-regard, real or not, at least appears as hard as tungsten.

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Filed under Crime, Mental Illness, Narcissistic, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology, Serial Killers

High Conflict Personality Versus Borderline Personality Disorder

People do not realize that clinicians hate to give out DSM diagnoses. If the number diagnoses doled out dropped next year, I for one would jump for joy. This is a diagnosis of mental illness and clinicians are not cavalier about giving out such a negative label on another human being.

Consequently, there are people who in effect have a BPD or Borderline Personality Disorder, but if they are functioning at a high level, we do not diagnoses them. The new term for such persons is “High Conflict Personalities.” Most of them are women. These are basically functional Borderlines in the same way that some are functional alcoholics. As long as they function well, we cannot diagnose them. Nevertheless, these High Conflict Personalities nevertheless wreak considerable havoc among their friends, co-workers and in particular boyfriends and husbands.

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High Self Esteem Does Not = Narcissism

Everybody thinks that high self-esteem and narcissism are the same thing. Maybe 90% of folks on the Net talking about narcissism believe this. They’re all wrong. Yes, all narcissists (NPD’s) have high self-esteem (too high really), but many people have high self-esteem who are not narcissists ( NPD’s)

By the way, I have an official opinion from my favorite therapist, a Clinical Psychologist i have known for years, that I do not have Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Idiots on the Net call me “narcissist” all the time, but they do not understand the word. But I was concerned enough that I was getting called this that I contacted my old therapist. The reason was because I was worried I was a narcissist (NPD). Why worried?

Because to tell the truth, I really do not like narcissists or NPD’s too much. I have known a few of them, and they turn me off. Some of them are out and out awful. The idea that I am one of these people I dislike so much was concerning to me. I would like to point out that it is dubious if anyone with NPD would ever worry about being a narcissist. The fact that you are worrying about such a thing in the first place indicates that you are probably not one because narcissists just don’t do that.

My therapist said I have “high self-esteem” which he said is generally regarded as a sign of good mental health. Please note that in recent years there has been a lot of backlash against high self esteem, with a lot of people saying it is not as good as we thought it was.

I now recognize that most of my best friends and role models of old had high self-esteem. Few if any of them were actual narcissists.

Most physicians, attorneys, professors and others with high positions I have met have high self-esteem and big egos, but few of them seemed to be actual narcissists.

I have dealt with a few famous people in my life, as in people who have Wikipedia entries, and they had very high self-esteem. In fact, some were out and out arrogant assholes with egos the size of small planets. But I doubt even these pricks were actual narcissists. They were just typical famous people with huge egos. Having a huge ego is a typical outcome for famous people, and big egos are omnipresent among those holding high positions in the professions.

The thing that is missing is the abuse. Simply having an excessively elevated opinion of yourself is not a definition of narcissism. Yes, narcissists have this, but many non-narcissists do too. The non-narcissists have what is called “high self-esteem.”  The narcissists have behond high self-esteem on the Self-Esteem Highway off into full blown Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

My therapist also said that another word for self-esteem was narcissism. So people with low self-esteem actually suffer from low narcissism, most folks have ordinary levels of narcissism necessary for any healthy life and people with high self-esteem have what is called high narcissism, which as noted, is thought to be a good thing. The problem is that as your self-regard grows higher and higher, you start to care less and less about others.

Simply put, abuse is an integral part of any NPD diagnosis. You can have an ego the size of Jupiter, but if you are still a good person who is nice and kind to other people, there is no way on Earth that you get an NPD diagnosis because we think that you are functioning well.

No abuse, no narcissism.

I don’t engage in narcissistic abuse of others. I have healthy friendships and relationships with women ( some of the later even go on long-term, as in years) and I get along well with at least some family members. Narcissists don’t have healthy relationships. Their relationships are full of narcissistic abuse and all the crap that goes along with that.

 

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Filed under Mental Illness, Narcissism, Narcissistic, Personality, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology

A “Regard Supply” Theory of Narcissism (Love of Self) and Love (Love of Others)

My theory is that we have only so much Regard in our psyches. As Regard goes higher and higher, there’s simply less and less available to dole out to other people. This theory works well for low self-esteem as such folks often seem to have extreme regard and caring about and for others. That is because they have little love for themselves,  so they have a huge excess love or regard supply that wants objects to focus on. So that love inside of them goes out into the world and attaches to other humans.

It is quite amazing how much love for other people some people with low self-esteem have. Saints are called that for a reason. I would assume that as self-regard goes higher, one simply starts using up their Love supplies or Regard supplies. We only have so much love or regard inside of us, we are not bottomless pits of sugar and spice and everything nice. As more and more your internal love is committed to the self, perhaps there is less and less to give out to others. Hence you have the NPD person who loves himself but cares little or nothing about others. Here is where the narcissistic abuse enters in.

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Filed under Mental Illness, Narcissistic, Personality Disorders, Psychology, Psychopathology