Category Archives: Domestic

Repost: Animal Grinder! (Four Animals, One Grinder)

Animal Grinder! Oh Hell yeah!

This is one of the greatest posts ever on this site. I cannot believe how many hits this post got. It’s one of the highest trafficked posts here of all time. Be careful though, this video is pretty gross! If you are easily upset by disturbing videos, I would exercise serious caution in watching this video.

I decided to move this video over to the video site. Find it here.

Välkommen svenska läsare! Detta inlägg är nu tillgänglig på svenska. Klicka här för den svenska versionen. Jag älskar Sverige!

Warning: Rare adverse reactions to this video, including vomiting, have been recorded. Please take appropriate precautions before watching the video.

The first animal is a cow, the second one is a pig, the third another cow and the last a horse.

I can’t believe this video. It isn’t really horrible or evil. It’s kind of gross, but hey that’s life, man. Mostly it’s just incredible. It just shows what goes on at a rendering plant. Whole dead farm animals are fed into the rendering machine via lifter and then ground up by this unbelievable machine, bones, heads, hooves and all.

A lot of posts on the Net are saying that these cows are alive. It’s not true. They just appear to be alive since once the grinder starts, they start moving around a lot due to the incredible force of the thing.

Another common misconception is that these animals are being ground up for human food like hot dogs.

That’s not true.

These are dead animals that died on farms somewhere so they are not really fit for consumption. The result might goes into, among other things, animal feed (especially for chickens) or pet food, and that’s not a pleasant thought (this is how Mad Cow Disease is being caused). The thought that this goes into pet food also bothers me. If it’s true, that does it. I’m never going to eat dog food again.

Usually the rendered dead animals are turned into fertilizer, which is a harmless use of them. They also turned into yellow (non-vegetable) oil. That’s used as grease for machinery. They also make soap out of this ground up Mr. Ed Puree.

People don’t realize that animals die all the time on farms, especially on modern factory farms. What people never think about is, how do you get rid of dead horses, cows and pigs? You can’t exactly drag them to the curb and leave them there for the garbageman. And it’s kind of hard to bury them in a hole. We don’t have animal graveyards for cows and horses, and incinerators don’t accept them.

This is where the rendering plant comes in. You sell the dead animal to the rendering plant, and they come and pick it up for you. They take it back to the plant and grind it up for Mulch N Grow or whatever. One problem with these rendering plants is that the smell emanating from them is truly horrendous, as people who live near them attest.

The guy driving that lift must have one of the country’s nastiest jobs. Can you imagine being the guy who has to clean the grinder out? If you look at that thing, it’s a horrible mess.

At the end of the video the lift tosses a horse in, and watching that sucker get ground up is incredible. One thing that blew me away was the sound of this crushing machine as it ground up bones and skulls. Wow!

There’s a particularly nasty segment at the second cow (2:11 in the video) segment where the thing lets out this massive spurt as it’s being crunched up. That means that that dead cow had been decaying for a while and was getting bloated as dead animals tend to do. That’s another reason why this meat is not fit for consumption by humans.

This video has been up for a few years, but it just started to go viral around mid-August 2009.

Isn’t it incredible the stuff that we can see on the Interwebs? Before Al Gore invented the Internets, how many of us ever saw a rendering plant in action?

The company that makes this sucker is out of Denmark. Just think of the tech that went into this machine. This thing is called the PB 30/60 Crusher.

A few thoughts:

  • Wouldn’t this be a great death penalty machine? Screw this lethal injection crap. 1st degree murder? I sentence you to the Grinder! We could sell tickets for large amounts of money for spectators to watch the killers get ground up alive and use the proceeds to help fund the state so the state can spend the money to help people. Damn I want one of these machines! Where can I buy one? I’d use it on some of my enemies. I would tie them up, throw them in the loader and dump them in the Grinder. Then I would charge like $1,000/head for spectators to watch, get rich and retire on the proceeds.
  • We should use this thing on dead humans to grind them up. That way we could save lots of graveyard space and use the future would-be graveyard space to build strip malls and Walmarts and other useful things. Actually, I think when I die, I want to be ground up like this. We could make it like a funeral thing and all of the funeral guests could come watch me get ground up and eat popcorn and stuff. It would be a great end to my life. After I get ground up, I would like to be canned as Robert Lindsay Chow and fed to my pet cats, assuming that I have any. If I don’t have any cats, I would ask to be made into cat food, because I love cats, and this way, cats could feast on someone who really loves them. Cats have given me so much love in my life, this would be my special way of giving back!
  • This video should have had some really brutal death metal music playing in the background of it, don’t you think?
  • Wouldn’t it be cool to see a dead elephant or giraffe get thrown in that thing, just for fun?
  • In my dream world, there would be 600 channels on cable. One of them should be the Animal Shredder Channel. That channel would show nothing but this machine grinding animals all day. To make it more interesting, they could vary the types of animals getting ground up. I would just turn it on and leave it on for hours at a time while I do my work and whatnot, just like background you know. Except I would probably change the channel when I was eating.

There are a lot of possibilities for alternate uses for this machine.

  • We could take some fat White kid raised by a single Mom on Twinkies and video games and stick him underneath the machine. The meat from the ground-up farm animals would fall all around him and all over him. It would land on his face, covering him. We would have workers with shovels to shovel the meat off of him so he wouldn’t get buried. He would keep his mouth open, and some of the meat would fall in. Then he would eat it. We would keep him under there, and he would get fatter and fatter. After about 10 years of that, he would be so fat he could become the King of Germany!
  • We could take the ground up animals and give them to Disney. Disney could reconstitute them into humans, especially teen idols like Selena, Miley and Britney. Little would their swooning fans realize that their favorite teen star was really a ground up horse!
  • We could use the machine to try to solve intractable conflicts. By grinding up pigs and cows both and making movies of it and distributing it to conflict zones, possibly we could make headway in the Hindu-Muslim conflict in Kashmir.

The possibilities are endless!

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6 Comments

Filed under Agricutlure, Animals, Domestic, Gross, Humor, Rendering Plants, Sick, Sick and Evil

Mother Cat Talking to Her Kittens

There’s your cute cat video for the day, folks. After that, it’s back to all that ugly politics, etc. stuff.

I believe that is actually a feeding call. She is calling them to feed – to nurse at her breasts.

Mother raccoons also make that weird purring sound when they have their kits with them. I used to hear it at my house in the mountains. People would say, “What in God’s name is that noise?” It was that same weird purring sound. Then with a flashlight, I would find a mother raccoon with three or four kits behind her. The kits walk in back of the mother, which is probably typical.

Baby quail stay with their mothers a pretty long time for birds. In the mountains, I used to see mother quail with baby quail behind them all they time. They often run when they are in a line like that, especially if your car is coming up on them. It’s actually rather funny to watch.

I assume with most mammals and land walking birds, the kits or fledglings walk in a straight line in back of the mother when they go walking around.

Some animals like birds like to walk in lines period. Even adult ducks or geese will often walk in a line for some odd reason.

9 Comments

Filed under Animals, Birds, Cats, Domestic, Mammals, Procyonids, Raccoons, Wild

“Old-Fashioned Pig Farming,” by Alpha Unit

Woodlands are a pig’s natural habitat. But pigs are adaptable to just about any environment. They live on every continent (except Antarctica).

In the forests and woodlands where wild pigs live, trees and vegetation provide them with shelter and their preferred foods. They like places where they’ll have year-round access to water and moist ground for wallowing, such as swamps and marshes.

In spring they graze on grasses and clover. Throughout the year they’ll forage for berries, nuts, acorns, mushrooms, insects, and sometimes small rodents. But one thing a pig was designed to do is root. A pig’s snout allows it to navigate and interact with its environment – sort of like a cat’s whiskers.

The nasal disc of a pig’s snout, while rigid enough to be used for digging, has numerous sensory receptors. In addition to being useful as a fine and powerful tool for manipulating objects, the extensive innervation in the snout provides pigs with an extremely well-developed sense of smell.

Pigs can smell roots and tubers that are deep underground and in the wild can spend up to 75 percent of their day rooting and foraging. Some homesteaders put pigs’ rooting instinct to work for them and use pigs to “till” garden plots.

Daniel MacPhee and his wife use Guinea Hog piglets on their New England farm, but unlike some farmers, they don’t plan to eat their pigs.

Instead, the piglets are meant as an environmentally- and -budget-friendly cleanup crew of sorts, rooting around to clean out tough, tangled roots after a small flock of sheep has grazed at the couple’s farm, Blackbird Rise in Palermo [Maine].

By having the animals do the work, “we’re not buying machinery and we’re not wasting fossil fuels,” said MacPhee, 35. “They’re eating the roots and vegetable matter, processing that and putting nutrients back in the soil through manure. They’re doing all the same things a tractor does but without the environmental impact.”

The Guinea Hogs on their farm are a “heritage breed,” the name given to any of the distinct breeds that can be traced back to the period before industrial farming. Generations ago, there were hundreds of pig breeds on homesteads in Europe and the United States. But a lot of the historic breeds fell out of favor as the pork industry moved toward leaner carcasses and began large-scale confinement operations. This was in part the result of corn production.

As the larger settled farms of the Midwest began to produce excess corn, the availability and low cost of this feed attracted pig production and processing to the region. By the mid-1800s the states that produced the most corn also produced the most pigs, and production declined in the East and New England. The industry was becoming geographically centralized as well and the number of breeds of pigs began to decline. Several breeds became extinct by the early 1900s.

Pigs are for the most part no longer produced and sold by independent producers on open markets. Since the late 20th century, pig production in the United States has come to be dominated by a few large, vertically-integrated corporations that control every step along the way from the selection of breeding stock to the retailing of pork. A lot of the farmers who are still in the business are contract growers for the corporations. But there are independent pig farmers who are dedicated to bringing back the old breeds and are raising them in the traditional way, on pasture and in woodlands.

Some heritage breeds are very rare and are listed as critically endangered by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy. Among heritage breeds is the very popular Berkshire pig, a black pig designated “first class”. Farmers say that Berkshires have an excellent disposition and are very friendly and curious.

The Tamworth is a golden-red pig and a direct descendant of the wild boars that roamed the forests of Staffordshire. They are considered very outdoorsy and athletic. (They make the best bacon in the United States, according to some fans.)

The Large Black retains the traits of its ancestors that lived on the pastures and woods of England in the 16th and 17th centuries. They are hardy animals that can withstand cold and heat. They are well-known as docile hogs.

The Hereford is a medium-size pig that is unique to the United States. Its name is inspired by its striking color pattern of intense red with white trim, the same as that of Hereford cattle. These pigs also have a reputation for being easy-going.

The Red Wattle is especially in danger of extinction. It is a large red hog with a fleshy wattle attached to each side of the neck. These pigs are very hardy with an especially mild temperament.

There are other heritage breeds, some of which number as low as a few hundred worldwide. Heritage pig farmers want to increase demand for their breeds, because to eat them is to preserve them, they say. There is, in fact, a growing market for heritage pork, which is more tender and tastes much better than mass-produced pork. Just looking at a cut of heritage pork you see a striking difference. It’s typically darker than pork from industrial farms, some as red as beef.

Of course, there are heritage pig farmers like the MacPhees, who just like having pigs on the farm, performing those unique tasks that pigs do.

If you’ve got children, there are heritage pig breeds they would easily get along with. Brian Wright raises heritage pigs and says that some are considered docile while others are seen as “evil, killer hogs” – in other words, very aggressive. You’ve got to do your homework before picking a breed.

The Rossi Farm in Rhode Island began breeding Gloucestershire Old Spot pigs several years ago and the pigs have become a favorite. Nicknamed Orchard Hogs, these pigs originally foraged for windfall apples and are distinguished by the black spots on their white coats.

The Rossis say Gloucestershire Old Spots are extremely friendly and laid-back. When the pigs are in the pasture, the children are often out there with them. And the pigs love having their ears scratched by the kids.

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Filed under Agricutlure, Alpha Unit, Animals, Domestic, Europe, Guest Posts, Livestock Production, Midwest, Northeast, Pigs, Regional, USA, Wild

Serves Him Right

Here.

5 Comments

Filed under Animals, Asia, Bestiality, China, Dogs, Domestic, Regional, Sex, Weirdness

“The Kinder, Gentler Version of Bull Riding,” by Alpha Unit

Little Yellow Jacket was a famous Brangus bull – a Brangus being a cross between an Angus and a Brahman. He had one horn pointing up and the other pointing down. The Professional Bull Riders organization made him “Bull of the Year” three different times. That’s a record.

He was in good company as Bull of the Year. There was Mossy Oak Mudslinger. And Chicken on a Chain. There were Panhandle Slim, Cripple Creek’s Promise Land, Code Blue, and Dillinger. But nobody was as notorious as the 1,800-pound “World’s Most Dangerous Bull.” That was Bodacious.

Bodacious first appeared on the circuit in 1992. In no time he was found to be virtually unrideable. According to the ProRodeo Hall of Fame:

All muscle, the bull with the distinctive yellow coloring bucked off 127 of his 135 riders and became known for a bone-crushing style that sent many riders to the hospital, including world champions Tuff Hedeman and Terry Don West. Bodacious was known for his explosive exit out of the chute…His ability to buck riders off before they could nod their heads did not endear him to the cowboys.

The way he came out of the chute was bad enough. But what really made Bodacious so fearsome was his signature move: he would raise his rear end, his head to the ground, causing the rider to shift his weight forward. He would then jerk his head up and smash the rider in the face.

Tuff Hedeman, one of the few riders who ever stayed on Bodacious, had an infamous meeting with Bodacious in 1995 during the Professional Bull Riders World Finals in Las Vegas. A mere second after exiting the chute, Bodacious jerked Hedeman down and head-butted him, shattering every bone in his face below the eyes. It took 13 hours of reconstructive surgery and five titanium plates to repair the damage. Hedeman told reporter Burkhard Bilger that his sense of smell and taste never returned.

That same year in the National Finals Rodeo, Scott Breding chose to wear a hockey mask for his ride on Bodacious. He needed more than that. Bodacious head-butted him and knocked him out, breaking his nose and bursting one of his eye sockets.

The next day Bodacious was retired from rodeo.

If bull-riding is more thrill than you can handle, no problem. Not everyone can take on the likes of Little Yellow Jacket, but just about anyone can pretend to. Plenty of bars have mechanical bulls for their patrons. You can even rent your own mechanical bull for a birthday party, graduation, or other festive occasion.

Or go to the county fair. All over the United States during the summer you can find enterprising men and women who announce “Have Bull, Will Travel.” Like Jerry and Kathy Boone of New Plymouth, Idaho, who carry their mechanical bull, Samson, to county fairs and rodeos throughout the region. Or Cal Perkins, who makes mechanical bulls right here in the US and whose bulls are found in all 50 states and a handful of other countries.

Cal Perkins was a professional bull rider in the late 1970s and early 1980s but quit the circuit when he and his wife decided to start a family. After his sons became interested in rodeo, he began building bucking machines. He now custom-builds mechanical bulls at his shop in the tiny town of Murtaugh in southern Idaho. He brands his creations “the world’s best bucking machines.” The Times-News of Idaho reports:

Perkins takes great pride in the realistic look of his bulls. Each machine is upholstered with cowhide from Brazil and a real bull’s head from Mexico. That’s one of the reasons his bulls are so popular, he said.

Perkins travels with two mechanical bulls, one a miniature bull created for the little ones; it will take a rider up to 180 pounds. The set-up for his regular mechanical bull, which includes a protective air-filled mat, is designed to protect a rider up to 250 pounds.

And what about the rider? What do I need to know before I get on a mechanical bull? Professional bull riding champions Shane Proctor and Luke Snyder offer a few tips to would-be mechanical bull riders, as reported by the Wall Street Journal.

  • “Have enough beer to drink so you can get your courage up.”
  • “Make sure to make really good friends with whoever is running the bull. It’s not like eight seconds with a real bull. If you piss off the ring guy, he can keep you on however long he likes.”
  • “Keep your chin down. Wherever your chin goes, that’s where your body is going to go.”
  • “Make sure your free hand is in front of you. It helps guide your direction.”
  • “Sit close to your hand holding the bull. It’s like a teeter-totter, so you want to establish your center of gravity. If you sit too far back, you will fall off.”
  • “Know you are going to wipe out, and know you are not going to look graceful, so have fun and just fall off.”

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Filed under Alpha Unit, American, Animals, Cows, Culture, Domestic, ER, Guest Posts, Idaho, Sports, USA, West

Man Shoots Dog; Dog Shoots Man – Film at 11

Here.

Who knows? Maybe karma exists after all.

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Every action has an equal and opposite reaction? Maybe so, and maybe that’s a damn good thing sometimes.

I am convinced that God has set aside a particularly nasty slice of Hell particularly for animal abusers. And they probably have to have a wall of around this area to keep the other denizens of Hell from killing them again and again.

Bad people have more morals than you think. It’s often not so much that they have “no morals” but that they have their own peculiar and perverse moral hierarchy. But a lot of bad people definitely believe in the concept of transgression, and they don’t like those they call immoral one bit. In fact they hate them far more than we do. They hate the violators of their own moral code so much that they will out and out murder them without a care in the world, while few of the rest of us would stoop that low.

3 Comments

Filed under Animals, Dogs, Domestic, Ethics, Florida, Philosophy, Regional, South, USA

Post of the Day

No comment, or rather, create your own caption.

No comment, or rather, create your own caption.

Is this a metaphor that speaks to some deep truths about life and the world, or instead is it just another idiotic Internet meme?

Discuss.

4 Comments

Filed under Animals, Cats, Domestic, Humor

Crime: Eating a Hamburger. Punishment: Death Penalty

Man eats a hamburger. Outraged mob beats him to death for this heinous crime. Government defends the mob who beat the poor sod to the death.

India a such a wonderful modern country!

India…is a shithole. Bears repeating.

10 Comments

Filed under Agricutlure, Animals, Asia, Cows, Crime, Domestic, Hinduism, India, Islam, Livestock Production, Regional, Religion, South Asia

You Will Never Eat Bacon Again

13 Comments

Filed under Agricutlure, Animals, Domestic, Livestock Production, Pigs

Are Cats and Dogs Genetically Domesticated?

Badc writes:

Progressive in this case is domestication, I remember an experiment by soviet scientists to domesticate silver foxes, the results was that the domesticated foxes had smaller snouts.

Robert, have you read about the domestication of silver foxes.

I think east Asian are the most domesticated race.

I think you may be correct. The more progressive races do seem more domesticated.

Yes I have read about those experiments. I think our cats and dogs have had domestication actually bred into them. That is, even when they are first born, they are already different from purely wild cats and dogs of the same species.

We think that our cats and dogs act good because we trained them that way, but I think there is more to it than that. They come out of the womb already part domesticated. In other words, with some more wild cats and dogs, you could raise them from birth and they might never settle down very much. It’s well known that some species just do not domesticate well.

Why are cats and dogs genetically domesticated? Maybe we have been breeding them that way for 9,000 years. Humans weren’t always so nice. When humans had pet dogs and cats 1000’s of years ago, some may have come out of the womb wild and never settled down. Their human owners may have just killed these wilder offspring because they are just not compatible to be pets. Or perhaps they turned them loose. Or perhaps they were likely to run away.

Possibly the very first dogs and cats to be domesticated were already pretty docile as this is what allowed them to be domesticated in the first place. Perhaps after the first domestication, pet stocks were repeatedly reinfused with new pets captured from the wild. The ones likely to be captured from the wild and adjust well in captivity were probably already more docile.

We don’t really have any wild cats and dogs to compare to our pets. Sure, we have bobcats, mountain lions, etc. and coyotes, wolves, etc. I have heard that coyotes don’t make very good pets. I saw a man at a gas station with a strange little dog that looked like a coyote. He told me it was in fact a coyote and its parents were killed and they took it in as a pet. I believe he said they didn’t make very good pets. I believe that the so-called dingo in Australia is simply Canis domesticus that has been running around wild for 40-50,000 years. They are just about the same species as Fido. I hear that dingos are pretty wild.

8 Comments

Filed under Animals, Canids, Carnivores, Cats, Dogs, Domestic, Foxes, Mammals, Science, Wild