A Myth: Your Childhood IQ Score Is Inaccurate and You Need to Retake the Test As an Adult

I once had a very high IQ commenter, a more or less autist neckbeard HBD’er who seemed like he couldn’t get laid with God’s help like most such types. But have no fear. He was going to conquer the world with that towering thundercloud of an IQ score of his. I’m afraid he is in for a very rude awakening.

We were discussing IQ’s in the comments when somehow we got invaded by neckbearded HBD autists. The conversation turned awkward and uncomfortable real fast like it always does with these social retards.

We are telling each other our IQ scores, and I volunteered mine, recorded at age 14. I’m not taking any more tests. I got my score, and I ain’t taking any more tests, thank you very much. I don’t need to keep going back and keep checking to see if my brain’s still there. Plus I am terrified I won’t reach my old score, and I’m vain as Hell. We conceited folks don’t take too kindly to assaults on our egos. They’re quite painful actually, almost physically painful.

This autist got all huffy and aggressive like they always do and insisted that my childhood score was completely worthless because child brains and adult brains are too different species that can’t mate or something. Or nothing. Or whatever. Or this or that. Or bla bla bla. I had to go back and take the IQ test again in adulthood to prove my head hadn’t fallen off at some point on the boy to man journey.

His argument was about as retarded as his socialization. I scoffed at him and told him that research showed he was wrong. He dug in his heels, got his back up, and pretty soon we had an argument. He kept repeating his notion over and over. He just would not let go of it. He was like a dog with a bone. That’s socially retarded, but it’s typical for these types once again.

I believe your IQ is pretty much fixed and research indicates that this is the case. You can raise it quite a bit in adolescence or early adulthood around college years. I believe you can raise it maybe 15 points. And perhaps you could drop your IQ by 15 points if you simply choose to turn your brain into a beer-addled couch potato.

Yet past age 23 or so, IQ is generally remarkably stable. In fact, statistically it is quite stable at age 7. If your childhood score is very high, you can usually take it to the bank. I don’t buy the idea that a childhood score is worthless and you have to go take the test again as a grownup to find out your “true adult IQ.” It’s asinine.

I will not tell you the score I got at age 14.

Just to show you what a tool that guy was, I retook the test in a clinical psychologist’s office at age 29.

My mother worked for a clinical psychologist and one day she asked me if I wanted to take an IQ test because he would give it to me for free where it usually is ~$200. The test was not all that hard but it was a bit challenging. Mostly it was just fun. It seemed to consist mostly of little puzzles, often weird figures and such and you had to figure out the pattern and predict the next one in the sequence. It was easier than I thought it would be, and I bombed out of high school math.

I never heard my score and he didn’t give it to my Mom. He just said “Over X number (I will not tell you the score).”

I received basically the same score as I got at age 14, and that was after the drugs had set in.

I’d been carpet-bombing my brain with all sorts of substance ordinances since age 16. But by that time at age 29, I had cut back. I only smoked pot maybe three times a month. I drank a couple six packs every weekend and maybe 2–3 beers a night during the week. I rarely did coke and that year I took my last LSD and psilocybin trips. I’ve only done meth maybe three times. I hadn’t taken pills in years. The rare PCP trips were a thing of the past, thank God.

I’ve been too scared to do psychedelics since, though I have taken them ~40 times with almost nothing in the way of problems. But then I often carefully prepared for trips and waited until I thought I was in a perfectly clear and centered place in my head before I tripped, especially on acid. I once kept a hit of acid in my fridge for 1 1/2 years because I didn’t think my head was OK enough for it. Finally after 18 months, I felt my head was sane enough to trip, and so I did.

But by age 29, my partying days were through. The Endless Party is the Greatest Show on Earth, until one day way you’re dead and it’s all over way too soon. You’ve got to quit or cut back sometime.

At age 29, my score was pretty much the same as it had been at age 14, with my pristine and virgin brain tissue still intact and not yet violated by a single drink or hit off a joint. The score was even somehow immune for the dope artillery barrage I had been firing at it for years.

I don’t really no what to say about this but maybe heavy pot and psychedelic use doesn’t have any permanent effects.

I can’t speak for other drugs because I never did enough of them. I did cocaine recreationally for 13 years, but I never got hooked on the stuff and my lifetime dose of the drug is probably less than an ounce. I took meth three times, enough to decide it was the most evil drug on Earth. I learned my lesson with PCP. They stuff even tasted like poison. It had this creepy metallic taste to it like it was actually chemically toxic. It wasn’t even fun to smoke like pot or hash. It felt like you were dunking your head in a pot of weird smelling chemical stew in some chemist lab.

Got a fancy childhood IQ score? Frame it and put it on the wall of your mind and don’t bother with another test.

 

8 Comments

Filed under Alcohol, Cannabis, Coke, Depressants, Dissociative Anesthetics, Dope, Hallucinogens, Intelligence, Intoxicants, LSD, PCP, Psilocybin, Psychology, Speed, Stimulants

8 responses to “A Myth: Your Childhood IQ Score Is Inaccurate and You Need to Retake the Test As an Adult

  1. Frito Pendejo

    I suppose you could compare IQ with such traits as height,weight,etc, as in if given the right kind of environment, your full potential can be realized, not unlike the way someone could reach their potential height if they have just enough nutrition. Biology may not be complete destiny, but I’d say it does provide a broad set of perimeters concerning what is possible!

  2. Phil78

    I think it’s a myth depending on the circumstance of a person’s IQ. If you were above average at childhood it will probably remain stable.

    However, if you are at about average IQ in childhood there is the possibility that it could be brain plasticity responding to a better environment but later in life, if your genetic IQ is quite low under a “regular environment”, then it may drop overtime.

  3. Phil78

    BTW, according to Murray, there are problems with the validity of IQ scores past 150 to begin with.

    Though whatever it measures, the results you mention seems to replicate the studies of other findings.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=0k9OAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA14&lpg=PA14&dq=study+social+problem+people+160+iq&source=bl&ots=9l30m2FtHf&sig=n4mMwIhBMljWkNregMcv13nOTts&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo0fDj8I3UAhVEQCYKHZn2BxwQ6AEIPjAF#v=onepage&q=study%20social%20problem%20people%20160%20iq&f=false

  4. Mick Johnson

    I do know IQ test scores can vary a great deal in some circumstances. My 8th grade score was 20 points lower than the score two years later. On the first test I struggled with the spatial section while scoring very well on the verbal part. This was in the 1956-1958 time frame. Stanford-Binet.

    The second time I took the test, the epiphany hit me and the spatial items became clear for the first time ever. ( I threw in epiphany as authors do to demonstrate their verbal fluency…the other words are hubris and detritus.) From about 2000-2010 every novel had at least two of the three.

    It may have been a one-time fluke thing but I will never know. That was the last time our class was tested.

    Yes, I am an old man now. I do question the accuracy of tests especially trying to compare newer tests to the ones we took. My grandson seemed unusually gifted so he was taken to a university for testing at age 9. He had some very high numbers on some sections but was way low in a couple and that pulled his final score down. He likely misunderstood the instructions due to ADD and perhaps a touch of Aspergers.

    THERE IS NO WAY that I am even in his league. I mean not in shouting distance. Yet, the test had him at a lower number.

  5. terrence

    Do you know if the internet has any serious IQ tests? 2 years ago, wondering where I could know mine for sure, you told me that my university has a psychologist who does IQ testing. It turned out it doesn’t, or rather, they don’t want random guys passing the test because it takes 4 hours off their schedule and they’re busy.
    But I do agree with those who say, that these tests are a waste of time if nobody, public or private sector, takes them into account. What a worker needs is obedience, not the quickest brains. What a careerist needs is ambition and social skills. What self-employed people need is discipline. If you aren’t any of that, it’s too bad, but I’d rather be one of the three than doing brain virtue signalling the rest of my life with other lonely gifted people.

  6. Tez

    Have you seen this post on PumpkinPerson’s blog?

    https://pumpkinperson.com/2016/08/22/is-iq-more-accurate-when-measured-in-childhood/

    Basically, PP’s take on it is that the younger you were tested, the more accurate the results ought to be.

  7. April

    Lmmfaooooo omg I didn’t read any comments , I’m just laughing at what Robert wrote 😂🤣 “I once kept a hit of acid in my fridge for 1 1/2 years because I didn’t think my head was OK enough for it. Finally after 18 months, I felt my head was sane enough to trip, and so I did.” 🤦🏼‍♀️

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