The Myth of Haiti as a Paradise under French Colonial Rule

Superb comment by Judith Mirville. This is one myth that so needs to die.

First of all, please never say again that platitude as to Haiti (or rather, Santo Domingo as it was then called) having been so prosperous and so sweet to live in under French rule, just before the revolted slaves turned it over into the hell-hole we know of nowadays.

Please keep in mind that Santo Domingo was definitely the harshest place for any black slave (and also for any white servant or prostitute) to end up in throughout all Middle Passage, it was the island with the shortest survival span for Negroes. It was actually a kind of extermination camp though accelerated exhaustion where negroes judged to non-docile to be sold to English American planters or to Portuguese Jews (Jews were indeed involved in slave trade and utilization in the Portuguese colonies — contrary to English American where they kept content with the financing of the antebellum Southern enterprises — but were also known to be more humane masters) were sold to a kind of buyer of last resort.

When the slave masters of Early Dixieland really wanted to scare recalcitrant manpower into submission and productivity, they threatened to sell them to Santo Domingo and made an example out of two or three. It was called the “Pearl of the Indies” not because of its enchanting setting, charming though it was then, but because of the highest and surest return shareholders in Europe expected from there, the best contemporary translation would be Blue Chip.

The revolution took place because those slaves knew they were in that Island to die anyway.

It took exactly twelve years and a quarter to unfold, from 14 August 1791 to 18 November 1803, and as it unfolded the Napoleonic regime ordered Final Solution (as it was called) through 100% extermination. About one twentieth survived. Among the favorite methods were the “pontoons” : decommissioned ships used as gas chambers : the hulks were filled up to the brim with prisoners to be killed with fumes emanating from burning sulfur and thrown into the sea so as to make room for another cargo.

France sacrificed her whole colonial empire in America, selling Louisiana to the Jefferson’s US among others, just to devote all the necessary logistical resources to that grisly enterprise as if it were her most sacred duty (Napoleon wanted to make his empire renowned for yet another thousand years repeating Crassus’ exploit against the revolt of Spartacus), and it failed.

The extermination camp had run so well that all tropical diseases and pests brought about by the authorities to make the place mortal for any fugitive or guerrilla ended up killing all the precious seaworthy French troops that were sent there too, and that would have been badly needed at Trafalgar (the voodoo legend also speaks of black magic used to that effect: given the fact that most of Haitian black magic is about poisons, this comes to no contradiction).

Lamenting the French regime in Haiti as a kind of prosperity never to dream on any more is tantamount to lamenting the good old days when Warsaw, Krakow and Auschwitz were German and under sound industrial management before entering the doldrums of East European post-war Communism.

23 Comments

Filed under Americas, Blacks, Caribbean, Colonialism, Europe, France, Haiti, Haitians, Health, History, Illness, Jews, Labor, Latin America, Louisiana, North America, Political Science, Race/Ethnicity, Regional, Revolution, South, The Americas, USA, Whites

23 responses to “The Myth of Haiti as a Paradise under French Colonial Rule

  1. Jason Y

    Good point here, but apparently David Duke and the late William Pierce would massively disagree with you – but it shows you how full of crap they are. Anyway, if these WNs are so wrong about Haiti – then they must be wrong about other stuff.

    • Escargot

      David Duke seems interested in the truth, I doubt he or Colonel Sanders would disagree. San Domingos productivity came at heavy price and black slaves were generally far worse off there than in the South. Anti-Whiteness is not justifiable though. France(then Gaul) was brutally colonized by Rome. Colonization rarely results in a paradise for subjugated people. Santo Domingo.

      • Jason Y

        Generally, a pecking order comes about. OK they colonized us and we are bitching, but then we find people worse off than we are and colonize them – and boy, “We cannot stand the cunts.”.

      • Jason Y

        Always funny how Brits and other masters of the world feel so humiliated with McDonald’s on every corner.

      • Gaul benefitted greatly from being annexed to the Roman empire (especially as an exporter of wine and of wine carrying facilites such as tunnels), not unlike post-war Japan which then only entered into consumption society. That can be seen studying the various ruins of the monuments and social facilities the Romans left. Gaul which used to be ruled in small kingdoms perpetually warring against each other as by divine decree, turned to the production and consumption of sensual goods.

        • Escargot

          Rome benefitted more. I believe the greatest amount of gold unhearthed was by Romans in Gaul. Gauls were decimated culturally and in some cases literally. Colonizers often are superior in ways, I feel all humans should be left in their natural state regardless.

  2. Jason Y

    William Pierce in his silly video that’s on YouTube tried to make the Haitian slavery seem humane – and then of course – all those silly French cultural leftist pansies started getting soft – and then paid the price for it with the rebellion. But as we have seen, this whole scenario was fiction.

  3. Jason Y

    When the slave masters of Early Dixieland really wanted to scare recalcitrant manpower into submission and productivity, they threatened to sell them to Santo Domingo and made an example out of two or three.

    I’m wondering, though, how in that day in age the slaves in Dixieland etc.. would have known about Santo Domingo. There was no mass communication like TV, the internet, or even phones.

    • They had no internet nor radio nor phones but the ruling class had already quite good snail mail and even pigeon mail, and when two or three of them was in touch of something everybody else in town was informed : everybody in Dixieland (it was an export-led economy, therefore in dire necessity to be informed the first about prices and sea-traffic) however illiterate or not so literate, knew about French and Spanish territories in the Middle Passage, even only for the very frequent risk of being enlisted against them. News could take a long time to reach people, but people were far more thirsty of them than nowadays, since the means to doctor them were even far less developed than the means to bring them. The American Anglo-Saxons never got then so proud of their ignorance as they would later on from Jackson onwards, let alone under Trump. Santo Domingo was by no means any more distant in terms of difficulty to reach the other shore in both directions than Fidel’s Cuba, and when the news of a slave revolt there reached the continent (about two days at most for the coastal cities, one week in the distant hillbillies) the planters were scared to death, more so than their own descendants would be during the Cuban missile crisis, especially since so many former French planters had taken refuge in New Orleans or amidst the US to escape their fate. Before that slave revolt in Santo Domingo, the place was rightfully known for the horrors it inflicted on everybody working there or to whomever dared spy the territory, Tortoise Island was also known as a dangerous and well-equipped pirate base of the first order, you just couldn’t do any maritime business with any place in the Middle Passage (as was called the whole of Gulf of Mexico down to deep Colombia) ignoring the dangers Santo Domingo posed. The place was also already very infamous for the very great number of ships that supernaturally disappeared in its coastal waters up to Bermuda. The French-speaking planters of Santo Domingo were nearly all Free Masons, not Catholics, though they were dead intent to impose Catholicism on the populace (both black and white). Masons though they were, they were not leftist pansies : they were sadistic Ayn Rand-like neoliberals for the most part (as per the very doctrine expounded by Voltaire and Sade), a great number of them had fled France because the local laws were too humane there for the commoners. Their reason for being Masons was gaining supernatural powers and one great way to do so was to make people suffer deliberately as a source of energy. Haiti is still a university of Black Magic and contrary to the urban legend most rituals of it are of French or Italian origin, not African : only the festive aspect of voodoo comprises a great deal of African references proper.

      • Phil78

        “Haiti is still a university of Black Magic and contrary to the urban legend most rituals of it are of French or Italian origin, not African : only the festive aspect of voodoo comprises a great deal of African references proper.”

        How is that so? So far I can find nothing the suggest diffusion of “black magic” via those groups into Haiti.

        Or do you mean that most rituals were “modified” under French rule?

        • Phil78

          Update:

          “Vodou, as it is known in Haiti and the Haitian diaspora, is the result of the pressures of many different cultures and ethnicities of people who were uprooted from Africa and imported to Haiti in the African slave trade. Under slavery, African culture and religion was suppressed, lineages were fragmented, and people pooled their religious knowledge and from this fragmentation became culturally unified. In addition to combining the spirits of many different African and Amerindian nations, Vodou has incorporated pieces of Roman Catholic liturgy to replace lost prayers or elements. Images of Catholic saints are used to represent various spirits or “mistè” (“mysteries”, actually the preferred term in Haiti), and many saints themselves are honored in Vodou in their own right. This syncretism allows Vodou to encompass the African, the Indian, and the European ancestors in a whole and complete way. It is truly a Kreyòl religion.”

          I see, so due to lost rituals they patched it up with Catholic elements, the way you phrased me believe that the direct rituals were rooted in French Black magic.

        • Phil78

          *you phrased it made me believe

        • Mike

          As if the imperial French weren’t superstitious.

        • Phil78

          “As if the imperial French weren’t superstitious.”

          Holding a strong outlook of the world and culture rooted religion =/= black magic rituals, as if I even denied that they were “superstitious” depending how you are using that word.

          As far as “black magic” goes I was think along the lines of Pagan rituals or perhaps ancient Abrahamic practices, but I couldn’t find such being particular to the French or notably introgressed in Voodoo which from my knowledge has clear direct links to Dahomean religious practices.

          Just for the sake of curiosity, where were you even going with this beyond the sake of feeling offended to every comment I make?

      • Mike

        Voodoo is a combination of many rituals not specifically from the African with ample doses of European superstitions thrown in. But just to mortify African culture racists like you pull things out of your ass to attribute it to dohomean practices.not surprising considering the level of vitriol you have towards them and the passion in which you decry any positives about the ancient African empires. Not every time your agenda serves its purpose like south Africa where you desperately faltered trying to prove khoisans were not black you silly racist white wannabe.

        • Phil78

          “Voodoo is a combination of many rituals not specifically from the African with ample doses of European superstitions thrown in.”

          And as far as I was concern I wasn’t familiar with any, my above research being the closest I could find. And technically it wasn’t even really of the same “kind” of rituals of black magic, hence my confusion when Judith used the term.

          “But just to mortify African culture racists like you pull things out of your ass to attribute it to dohomean practices.”

          Do research before you make assumptions about my motivations.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_African_Vodun-

          “It is distinct from the various African traditional religions in the interiors of these countries and is the main source of religions with similar names found among the African Diaspora in the New World such as Haitian Vodou; Puerto Rican Vodú; Cuban Vodú; Dominican Vudú; Brazilian Vodum; and Louisiana Voodoo.”

          “not surprising considering the level of vitriol you have towards them and the passion in which you decry any positives about the ancient African empires.”

          Where did I even judge Voodoo? I distinguished elements diffused into it that weren’t black magic only because they were not.

          “Not every time your agenda serves its purpose like south Africa where you desperately faltered trying to prove khoisans were not black you silly racist white wannabe.”

          No, this thread serves a purpose for you to start a fight for no reason. I asked Judith a question of how European rituals diffused into Voodoo and found little info beyond there use of Catholic tradition to patch in elements loss when Voodoo was restricted.

          So far Judith hasn’t responded to correct me if I was wrong.

        • Phil78

          And as for the Khoi-san. Again, read this as they separated into the HG section.

          http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v517/n7534/full/nature13997.html

  4. Jason Y

    The massively anti-white, though massively justified in this sense, Burn! was about the Haitian revolution.

  5. Jason Y

    Stuff like this makes me massively doubt the existence of God. How about you?

  6. Jason Y

    On the lighter side, they’ve replaced Santo-Domingo with The Waffle House. 😆

  7. Jason Y

    Lamenting the French regime in Haiti as a kind of prosperity never to dream on any more is tantamount to lamenting the good old days when Warsaw, Krakow and Auschwitz were German and under sound industrial management before entering the doldrums of East European post-war Communism.

    Oh, those good ole days at Santo-Domingo sipping lemonade with Colonel Sanders. 😆

  8. Frito Pendejo

    Whatever regime the Haitians have lived under, whether it’d be slaves in French Santo Domingo, free under the Duvalier dynasty, or whatever, life as a Haitian always sucks shit!

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