Joke of the Night

Anyway, a Nazi billionaire and a Jewish socialist walk into a bar. The bartender says…

Oh, I forget the rest. Anyone remember how the rest goes?

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Just In: Sanders and Trump Win in New Hampshire

A couple of serious victories by two frankly insurgent candidates who are out to smash the political status quo. Sanders is out to smash the Democratic status quo, and Trump is out to smash the Republican status quo. It is appears there are mass rebellions against the official parties, against the DNC and the RNC, with the implication that people on both sides of the political fence have had it up to here with the way things are and are ready for a serious, even radical, break with business as usual.

A spectre is haunting the American world. The spectre of populism!

The populists of America refuse to conceal their aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of the two existing political parties. Let the two parties of America tremble at the possibility of a populist revolution.

People of America unite! You have nothing to lose but your chains! You have a nation to win!

I will leave this post up for anyone who wishes to discuss the earth-shattering results of the New Hampshire elections, what they mean, and what lies in store for us, trembling in wait.

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Filed under Democrats, Political Science, Politics, Regional, Republicans, US Politics, USA

Who Is This Woman?

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Mystery woman. You would recognize her 15-20 years ago but maybe not now.

Who is this woman? How old is she? What is she famous for?

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Filed under Democrats, US Politics, Women

Repost: Masculine Feminine Dualities Chart

Here.

This is a very popular post that is still being linked all over the web. I will repost it again because I believe many of you are new and you have not read it yet.

Go ahead and comment on it as there is a lot to comment on. You can say whatever you want. You can even say that this is sexist, well some women are like the masculine quality, some men are like the feminine quality, bla bla. That’s PC bullshit, but some of you SJW’s on here like to talk like that. As I said, I will not ban on these comments, but I will say in advance that that is a retarded critique of the post.

First of all, it’s not about men and women. It’s about the masculine spirit and the feminine spirit. Keep in mind that aspects of both the masculine and feminine spirits are probably present in most if not all humans. I agree with Weininger on that one.

So when your critique is, “Hey some women are like that male spirit,” or “Hey, some men are like that female spirit,” you are being an SJW retard, but that phrase is a redundancy. Let me reiterate this over and over: Masculine spirit does not = men. Feminine spirit does not = women! Got it, SJW’s? Any given man probably has some feminine spirit in him and may have a number of the attributes below. Any given women probably has some of the masculine spirit and may have any number of the masculine attributes below.

One way to look at this is to see this as a binary view of the universe. We can say that the universe is 50% masculine spirit and 50% feminine spirit. Neither one is better than the other, and in fact, they are quite complimentary and fit together like two pieces of a jigsaw puzzle.

In fact, without each other, these spirits are rather bereft. For instance, if you are a man who lives only in the masculine half of the universe, that’s ok by me and a lot of men probably do just that. However, my point would be that you are only living in half the world. You are missing out on one half of the whole universe that you could be experiencing. Although it is fine with many folks to live in only half of the world and blow off the other half, personally I think you are living a somewhat diminished life by doing that.

I would also argue that these spirits modify each other. In parts of the world where there is excessive masculine spirit, there are all sorts of problems. I am sure you know what I am talking about. Latin America and the Arab and Muslim world, I am looking at you. These places are suffering from an imbalance of spirit. They need more feminine spirit to equalize matters and create a more harmonious society. As it is, they are out of balance.

Excessive feminine spirit doesn’t really work either. All-female workplaces are known to be nightmarish, and the women who work there will be the first to tell you so. The PC West currently suffers from excessive feminine spirit, and the results are not pretty in my opinion. This out of balance world has resulted in the growth of MRA’s, PUA’s, Game, Red pill, the Alternative Right, etc. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Remember? Works in sociopolitics as well.

Ultimately I would argue that when you have a true excess of feminine spirit, probably not a lot of work gets done, people are probably not very ambitious, there could be a lot of chaos and dysfunction in society and ultimately society pretty much falls apart. I believe that society must be run pretty much according to the masculine principle. The feminine principle can participate, but a collaborator with the ruling principle, not a competitor to it.

One way to divide the world is into masculine and feminine essences or spirits. Half of the world is the Masculine Spirit and the other half of the world is the Feminine Spirit. If a man only lives in the Masculine Spirit, he is missing out on half the world! Similarly, if a woman only lives in the Feminine Spirit, she too is blind to half of the world.

This post made a lot of women mad. They called it sexist and left the blog or got banned. Oh well. I happen to think there is something to this.

Feel free to comment. I think it is an interesting chart:

The first five principles are by Otto Weininger and are bolded, but the last 56 are by me.

Characters     Masculine   Feminine 

Principles

Activity       Active        Passive
Consciousness  Conscious     Unconscious
Thinking       Objective     Subjective
Genius         Yes           No
Productivity   Productive    Nonproductive
Energy         Generative    Receptive
Mind           Thinking      Feeling
Emotion        Stoic         Moody
Tactile        Callous       Sensitive
Humor          Slapstick     Irony
Weather        Calm          Unsettled
Temperature    Cold          Warm
Graph          Linear        Scatterplot
Empathy        Poor          Rich
Pain           Inflict       Receive
Confrontation  Forward       Withdrawal
Reaction       Contemplative Reactive
Style          Deliberative  Unthinking
Intensity      Concentration Distraction
Denial style   Projection    Fantasy
Egotism style  Narcissism    Histrionic
Pathology      Sociopath     Borderline
Defense        Anger         Denial
Ego desire     Expansion     Dissolution
Depression     Sublimation   Immersion
Reliance       Self          Others
Compassion     Little        Great
Wakefulness    Aware         Unaware
Alertness      Wide Awake    Sleepwalking
Planning       Methodical    Conspiring
Morality       Strict        Contingent
Aggression     Physical      Subterfuge
Violence       External      Internal
Warfare        Bully         Victim
Hierarchy      Dominant      Submissive
Force          Blunt         Subtle
Texture        Harsh         Smooth
Resistance     Extreme       Yielding
Linear         Straight      Jagged
Presentation   Forthright    Devious
Surface        Clear         Opaque
Understand     Simple        Complicated
Logic          Linear        Circular
Movement       Stiff         Flowing
Grain          Coarse        Fine
Instrument     Blunt         Subtle
Transport      Highway       Stream
Route          A to B        Roundabout
Tour           Autobahn      Scenic route
Flight         Soar          Flutter
Hobby          Monomania     Dilettante
Truths         Multiple      Singular
Theory         Branching     Obsessive
Fact           Durable       Momentary
Manichean      Yes           Grey Area
Systematics    Categorizing  Noncategorizing
Science        Empirical     Intuitive
Philosophy     Tough         Dream State
Ubermensch     More common   Less common
Body           Hard          Soft
Tissue         Sinewy        Fatty
Signal         Weathervane   Antenna
Telepathy      Illiterate    Mindreader
Broadcast      Subwoofer     Subliminal 
Travel         Itinerary     Lark  
Decision       Plotted       Whimsy
Confusion      Certainty     Perplexed
Party          Kegger        Cocktail  
Social         Optional      Mandatory
Sex            Compulsion    Choice
Intellectual   Paradise      Boredom
Bird           Hawk          Hummingbird  
Birdsong       Crow          Warbler 
Love           Auxiliary     Requirement 
Danger         Physical      Psychological 
Grudge         Discard       Retain  
Armistice      Reconcile     Cold Peace
Storm          Thunderstorm  Spring Shower
Communication  Telegraph     Epistolary novel
Law            Spirit        Letter
Style          Avant-garde   Fashion   

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Filed under Cultural Marxists, Culture, Gender Studies, Heterosexuality, Metaphysics, Philosophy, Politics, Sex, Social Problems, Sociology

A Look at the Ndali Language

Method and Conclusion. See here.

Results. A ratings system was designed in terms of how difficult it would be for an English-language speaker to learn the language. In the case of English, English was judged according to how hard it would be for a non-English speaker to learn the language. Speaking, reading and writing were all considered.

Ratings: Languages are rated 1-6, easiest to hardest. 1 = easiest, 2 = moderately easy to average, 3 = average to moderately difficult, 4 = very difficult, 5 = extremely difficult, 6 = most difficult of all. Ratings are impressionistic.

Time needed. Time needed for an English language speaker to learn the language “reasonably well”: Level 1 languages = 3 months-1 year. Level 2 languages = 6 months-1 year. Level 3 languages = 1-2 years. Level 4 languages = 2 years. Level 5 languages = 3-4 years, but some may take longer. Level 6 languages = more than 4 years.

This post will look at the Ndali language in terms of how difficult it would be for an English speaker to learn it.

Niger-Kordofanian
Niger-Congo
Volta-Congo
Benue-Congo
Bantoid
Southern
Narrow Bantu
Central
M
Nyika-Safwa

Ndali is a Bantu language with 220,000 speakers spoken in Northern Malawi and Southern Tanzania. It has many strange tense forms. For instance, in the past tense:

Past tense A: He went just now.
Past tense B: He went sometime earlier today.
Past tense C: He went yesterday.
Past tense D: He went sometime before yesterday.

Future tense is marked similarly:

Future tense A: He’s going to go right away.
Future tense B: He’s going to go sometime later today.
Future tense C: He’s going to go tomorrow.
Future tense D: He’s going to go sometime after tomorrow.

Ndali gets a 5 rating, extremely hard to learn.

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Filed under Applied, Bantu, East Africa, Language Families, Language Learning, Linguistics, Niger-Congo, Niger-Kordofanian, Regional, Tanzania

A Look at the Anyin Language

Method and Conclusion. See here.

Results. A ratings system was designed in terms of how difficult it would be for an English-language speaker to learn the language. In the case of English, English was judged according to how hard it would be for a non-English speaker to learn the language. Speaking, reading and writing were all considered.

Ratings: Languages are rated 1-6, easiest to hardest. 1 = easiest, 2 = moderately easy to average, 3 = average to moderately difficult, 4 = very difficult, 5 = extremely difficult, 6 = most difficult of all. Ratings are impressionistic.

Time needed. Time needed for an English language speaker to learn the language “reasonably well”: Level 1 languages = 3 months-1 year. Level 2 languages = 6 months-1 year. Level 3 languages = 1-2 years. Level 4 languages = 2 years. Level 5 languages = 3-4 years, but some may take longer. Level 6 languages = more than 4 years.

This post will look at the Anyin language in terms of how difficult it would be for an English speaker to learn it.

Niger-Kordofanian
Niger-Congo
Atlantic–Congo
Kwa
Potou-Tano
Tano
Central Bia
Northern

Anyin is a language spoken by 860,000 people in Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana.  It is relatively straightforward as far as African languages go. Probably the hardest part about the language is that it is tonal, and it does have two tones. The phonology does have the unusual +-ATR contrast which will seem very odd. ATR stands for advanced tongue root, so the language has a contrast between vowels with an advanced tongue root and without one. However, the grammar is pretty regular. There are few confusing phonological processes.

Anyi has a simple tense system, with only present, past and future. There is no aspect, mood or voice marking, and it lacks the noun class systems so common in many African languages. It has a plural marker, but it is often optional.

The syntax does have serial verbs, which will seem odd to Westerners. It distinguishes between relative clauses marked with and subordinate clauses marked with .

Anyin gets a 4 rating, very hard to learn.

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Filed under Applied, Ivory Coast, Language Families, Language Learning, Linguistics, Niger-Congo, Niger-Kordofanian, Regional, West Africa

A Look at the Ga Language

Method and Conclusion. See here.

Results. A ratings system was designed in terms of how difficult it would be for an English-language speaker to learn the language. In the case of English, English was judged according to how hard it would be for a non-English speaker to learn the language. Speaking, reading and writing were all considered.

Ratings: Languages are rated 1-6, easiest to hardest. 1 = easiest, 2 = moderately easy to average, 3 = average to moderately difficult, 4 = very difficult, 5 = extremely difficult, 6 = most difficult of all. Ratings are impressionistic.

Time needed. Time needed for an English language speaker to learn the language “reasonably well”: Level 1 languages = 3 months-1 year. Level 2 languages = 6 months-1 year. Level 3 languages = 1-2 years. Level 4 languages = 2 years. Level 5 languages = 3-4 years, but some may take longer. Level 6 languages = more than 4 years.

This post will look at the Ga language in terms of how difficult it would be for an English speaker to learn it.

Niger-Kordofanian
Niger-Congo
Atlantic–Congo
Kwa
Nyo
Ga-Dangme

The African Bantu language Ga has a bad reputation for being a tough nut to crack. It is spoken in Ghana by about 600,000 people. It has two tones and engages in a strange behavior called tone terracing that is common to many West African languages. There is a phonemic distinction between three different types of vowel length. All vowels have 3 different lengths – short, long and extra long. It also has many sounds that are not in any Western languages.

Ga gets a 6 rating, hardest of all to learn.

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Filed under Applied, Language Families, Language Learning, Linguistics, Niger-Congo, Niger-Kordofanian, Regional, West Africa

A Look at the Kam Languages

Method and Conclusion. See here.

Results. A ratings system was designed in terms of how difficult it would be for an English-language speaker to learn the language. In the case of English, English was judged according to how hard it would be for a non-English speaker to learn the language. Speaking, reading and writing were all considered.

Ratings: Languages are rated 1-6, easiest to hardest. 1 = easiest, 2 = moderately easy to average, 3 = average to moderately difficult, 4 = very difficult, 5 = extremely difficult, 6 = most difficult of all. Ratings are impressionistic.

Time needed. Time needed for an English language speaker to learn the language “reasonably well”: Level 1 languages = 3 months-1 year. Level 2 languages = 6 months-1 year. Level 3 languages = 1-2 years. Level 4 languages = 2 years. Level 5 languages = 3-4 years, but some may take longer. Level 6 languages = more than 4 years.

This post will look at the Kam languages in terms of how difficult it would be for an English speaker to learn it.

Tai-Kadai
Kam-Tai
Kam-Sui

The Kam languages people are three closely related languages – Northern Dong, Southern Dong and Cao Miao. They are spoken by 1.5 million Dong people in southwest China and by a tiny population in a single village in Northern Vietnam. These languages were rated by the Fudan University study referenced above under Wu as the 2nd most phonologically complex on Earth (Wang 2012). There are 32 stem initial consonants, including oddities like , tɕʰ, , pʲʰ, ɕ, , kʷʰ, ŋʷ, tʃʰ, tsʰ. Note the many contrasts between aspirated and unaspirated voiceless consonants, including bilabial palatalized stops, labialized velar stops, and alveolar affricates. There are an incredible 64 different syllable finals, and 14 others that occur only in Chinese loans.

There are an astounding 15 different tones, nine in open syllables and six in checked syllables (entering tones). Main tones are high, high rising, high falling, low, low rising, low falling, mid, dipping and peaking. When they speak, it sounds as if they are singing.

The Kam languages get a 6 rating, hardest of all to learn.

References

Wang, Chuan-Chao et al. 2012. Comment on ”Phonemic Diversity Supports a Serial Founder Effect Model of Language Expansion from Africa.” Science 335:657.

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Filed under Applied, Asia, China, Language Families, Language Learning, Linguistics, Regional, Tai-Kadai

A Look at the Malagasy Language

Method and Conclusion. See here.

Results. A ratings system was designed in terms of how difficult it would be for an English-language speaker to learn the language. In the case of English, English was judged according to how hard it would be for a non-English speaker to learn the language. Speaking, reading and writing were all considered.

Ratings: Languages are rated 1-6, easiest to hardest. 1 = easiest, 2 = moderately easy to average, 3 = average to moderately difficult, 4 = very difficult, 5 = extremely difficult, 6 = most difficult of all. Ratings are impressionistic.

Time needed. Time needed for an English language speaker to learn the language “reasonably well”: Level 1 languages = 3 months-1 year. Level 2 languages = 6 months-1 year. Level 3 languages = 1-2 years. Level 4 languages = 2 years. Level 5 languages = 3-4 years, but some may take longer. Level 6 languages = more than 4 years.

This post will look at the Malagasy language in terms of how difficult it would be for an English speaker to learn it.

Austronesian
Malayo-Polynesian
Greater Barito
East Barito
Malagasy

Malagasy, the official language of Madagascar, has a reputation for being even easier to learn than Indonesian or Malay.

Malagasy gets a 1 rating, easiest of all to learn.

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Filed under Applied, Austro-Tai, Austronesian, East Africa, Language Families, Language Learning, Linguistics, Madagascar, Malayo-Polynesian, Regional

A Look at the Kwaio Language

Method and Conclusion. See here.

Results. A ratings system was designed in terms of how difficult it would be for an English-language speaker to learn the language. In the case of English, English was judged according to how hard it would be for a non-English speaker to learn the language. Speaking, reading and writing were all considered.

Ratings: Languages are rated 1-6, easiest to hardest. 1 = easiest, 2 = moderately easy to average, 3 = average to moderately difficult, 4 = very difficult, 5 = extremely difficult, 6 = most difficult of all. Ratings are impressionistic.

Time needed. Time needed for an English language speaker to learn the language “reasonably well”: Level 1 languages = 3 months-1 year. Level 2 languages = 6 months-1 year. Level 3 languages = 1-2 years. Level 4 languages = 2 years. Level 5 languages = 3-4 years, but some may take longer. Level 6 languages = more than 4 years.

This post will look at the Kwaio language in terms of how difficult it would be for an English speaker to learn it.

Austronesian
Malay-Polynesian
Oceanic
Central-Eastern Oceanic
Southeast Solomonic
Malaita–San Cristobal
Malaita
Northern Malaita

Kwaio is an Austronesian language spoken by 13,000 people in the center of Malaita Island in the Solomon Islands. It has four different forms of number to mark pronouns – not only the usual singular and plural but also the rarer dual and the very rare paucal. In addition, there is an inclusive/exclusive contrast in the non-singular forms.

For instance:

1 dual inclusive (you and I)
1 dual exclusive (I and someone else, not you)

1 paucal inclusive (you, I and a few others)
1 paucal exclusive (I and a few others)

1 plural inclusive (I, you and many others)
1 plural exclusive (I and many others)

Pretty wild!

Kwaio gets a 5 rating, extremely hard to learn.

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Filed under Applied, Austro-Tai, Austronesian, Language Families, Language Learning, Linguistics, Malayo-Polynesian